Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 46

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Colorado Boy, 17, Shot Dead During Robbery By Cheerleader, 3 Other Teens Who Wanted Vaping Products - Over $25 worth of vaping products
  • As NC attorney general tries to slow Juul use among NC teens, researchers weigh health effects of e-cigarettes - Weight loss a symptom
  • McConnell unveils bill to combat youth tobacco use by raising purchase age to 21 - "Youth vaping is a public health crisis"
  • Most of Juul’s Twitter followers are teens who can’t buy e-cigs - And they say they don't market to kids


Age ID

A cheerleader and three teenagers are suspected of killing a high school student over $25 worth of vaping products. Lloyd Chavez was shot dead outside his home in Centennial, a city 16 miles south-east of Denver, Colorado, at 9:30 p.m. local time (11:30 p.m. ET) on May 8.

The victim and Mitchell began arguing in the front yard and at some point during the altercation, a shot was fired and hit Chavez in the chest. Serrano insisted it was Mitchell who fired the shot, explaining Gallegos had not got physically involved in the altercation.

COLORADO BOY, 17, SHOT DEAD DURING ROBBERY BY CHEERLEADER, 3 OTHER TEENS WHO WANTED VAPING PRODUCTS, POLICE SAY


Age ID 

Luka Kinard was a 15-year-old high school freshman when he started vaping, first inhaling the flavored nicotine at a high school football game as a way to fit in.

As Luka became, by his description, the go-to-guy for other students to vape with, his mother Kelly Kinard became more and more troubled by a pendulum swing in his behavior.

His grades plunged. His weight dropped.

As NC attorney general tries to slow Juul use among NC teens, researchers weigh health effects of e-cigarettes



Age ID

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell formally introduced legislation Monday to raise the age for buying tobacco and e-cigarettes to 21, a move designed to combat the health effects of tobacco addiction across the country and help his home state of Kentucky move off production of the crop that has sagged in popularity for decades.

"Youth vaping is a public health crisis," McConnell said. "It's our responsibility as parents and public servants to do everything we can to keep these harmful products out of high schools and out of youth culture."

"Kentucky farmers don't want their children to get hooked on tobacco products while they are in middle school or high school any more than any parent anywhere wants that to happen," McConnell said. "Kentucky is proud of what we make but we also want pride in the health and development of our children and the sad reality is that Kentucky's been home to the highest rates of cancer in our country."

McConnell unveils bill to combat youth tobacco use by raising purchase age to 21


Age ID

Almost half of the people who followed Juul on Twitter last year were not old enough to legally purchase e-cigarettes in the United States, according to a study published on Monday.

Researchers analyzed data collected in April 2018 on public followers of Juul’s Twitter account (@JUULvapor) with at least one public tweet. About 45% of those who followed Juul were 13 to 17 years old, according to the study published online in JAMA Pediatrics.


Most of Juul’s Twitter followers are teens who can’t buy e-cigs

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 45

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Behind The Scenes As State Inspectors Police Boston Nightclubs - Enforcing laws designed to protect patrons of the state’s clubs and bars
  • 20% of NC stores caught selling tobacco to minors, putting federal funds at risk - Law enforcement is cracking down on selling tobacco to minors
  • Vaping crackdown: Ohio, other states continue push to stop teen use - Trying to stem an epidemic of underage e-cigarette use
  • Touchstone Medical Imaging to pay $3 million settlement for security breach - Exposed the health information of more than 300,000 patients


Age ID

Outside Venu, the line to get in is so long that dozens of people spill out onto the streets. This is one of Boston’s hottest nightclubs. It’s also where 23-Year-old Jassy Correia was last seen before she was allegedly abducted and murdered back in February.

On a recent Friday night, the I-Team went along with the Massachusetts Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission to get an exclusive, behind-the-scenes look at how they are enforcing laws designed to protect patrons of the state’s clubs and bars.

Behind The Scenes As State Inspectors Police Boston Nightclubs


Age ID 

Law enforcement is cracking down on businesses selling tobacco to minors.

Officers say it's not only putting the minors' health at risk, but also millions of dollars of state funding.

Israel Morrow, special agent in charge with North Carolina Alcohol Law Enforcement, says the number of children using tobacco products is alarming. 

"They've become dependent on it like some people become dependent on drugs," Morrow said.

20% of NC stores caught selling tobacco to minors, putting federal funds at risk


Age ID

When Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine announced his plan last month to raise the state tobacco age to 21, he joined what has become a critical mass of states and localities trying to stem an epidemic of underage e-cigarette use.

The numbers are shocking – between 2017 and 2018 alone, e-cigarette use increased 78 percent among high school students and 48 percent among middle school students, according to the Food and Drug Administration.

Vaping crackdown: Ohio, other states continue push to stop teen use


Retail ID

A medical imaging service provider in Tennessee has agreed to pay $3 million to the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as a settlement for a security breach that exposed the protected health information of more than 300,000 patients.

The result of an FTP server providing uncontrolled access to patients’ personal health information, the breach at Touchstone Medical Imaging led to the leaking of names, birth dates, social security numbers, and addresses among other information. The details were accessed and indexed by search engines, and remained on the internet even after the server was taken offline. 

 


Touchstone Medical Imaging to pay $3 million settlement for security breach

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 44

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Another lawsuit filed against JUUL is serving as a reminder of how addicting vaping can be - Exploiting adolescents and getting them hooked
  • Northridge man convicted of identity theft, other counts in $3 million conspiracy - To prevent identity theft and fraud
  • Cyber security breach found at American Baptist Homes of the Midwest - Most Americans think they will be victims of cyber crime
  • 200 Undercover Youth Decoys Helping State Catch Tobacco Retailers Selling to Minors - The decoys are recruited volunteers 


Age ID

A Sarasota County family filed a lawsuit against e-cigarette company JUUL Labs Inc., for exploiting adolescents and getting them hooked on the aerosol devices that deliver a more powerful hit of nicotine than cigarettes.

But the family isn't the first to file a lawsuit about the e-cigarette company.

Not long after Marlboro cigarette maker Altria purchased a 35 percent stake in JUUL for $12.8 billion in Dec. 2018, the U.S. Surgeon General issued an advisory, in which 

Another lawsuit filed against JUUL is serving as a reminder of how addicting vaping can be

Retail ID 

A jury found a Northridge man guilty on Friday, May 3, of fraud, money laundering and identity theft in a conspiracy that netted at least $3 million in ill-gotten funds, prosecutors said Monday.

Turhan Lemont Armstrong, 49, was convicted of all 51 offenses listed in a grand jury indictment, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Los Angeles said in a news release. The charges included conspiracy to commit financial institution fraud and the interstate transportation of stolen vehicles.

Northridge man convicted of identity theft, other counts in $3 million conspiracy


Retail ID

American Baptist Homes of the Midwest, owner of Thorne Crest Senior Living Community and Crest Services in Albert Lea, on Monday announced it had an information security breach that could potentially affect some residents.

According to a press release, an unauthorized party gained access to the organization’s computer system and infected the system with malware. The malware reportedly encrypted many of the organization’s records, making them inaccessible out of an effort to extort money — also known as ransomware.

Cyber security breach found at American Baptist Homes of the Midwest


Age ID

In California, a person must be 21 years old to buy any tobacco products, including e-cigarettes and vapes. The decoys work with 24 peace officers, who regularly participate in tobacco enforcement activities, a CDPH spokesperson explains.

About 200 undercover youth decoys are helping state public health officials catch tobacco retailers who sell any type of tobacco products to minors.

The decoys are 15 to 20 years old and their identities are kept confidential, according to the California Department of Public Health.


200 Undercover Youth Decoys Helping State Catch Tobacco Retailers Selling to Minors

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 43

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Underage vaping citations up more than 800% in Northwest Valley - Many of them minors accepting responsibility for violations
  • Compliance Checks Find Underage Milwaukee Youth Still Have Easy Access To Flavored Tobacco - The 25% rate increase from the previous year
  • North Port increases DUI education after three fatal crashes - The effort to curb underaged drinking comes as prom and graduation draw near
  • F.D.A. Permits the Sale of IQOS, a New Tobacco Device" - A “heat not burn” tobacco device made by Philip Morris International

Age ID

On a recent Tuesday, a Maricopa County justice court in Surprise was comfortably packed with more than a dozen people, many of them minors accepting responsibility for violations such as curfew, underage drinking and tobacco possession.

It is the latter offense that has been seeing some serious traffic within the regional courtroom — turns out, more West Valley children are being cited for underage tobacco due to the to rise in the popularity of vaping devices and e-cigarettes.

Underage vaping citations up more than 800% in Northwest Valley

Age ID 

One in four tobacco retailers in the City of Milwaukee sold tobacco or nicotine products to underage youth during 2018 compliance checks, according to newly released data from Wisconsin Wins.

During the Wisconsin Wins compliance checks, minors attempt to purchase tobacco or nicotine products, including cheap, flavored cigarillos, cigarettes, e-cigarettes, or single cigarettes.

If they are successful, a Milwaukee police officer working with the minors writes a ticket on the spot or retailers can choose to sign up for the MARTS program (Milwaukee Achieving Responsible Tobacco Sales) to avoid citation.

Verizon asks the FCC to let it lock new smartphones for 60 days


Age ID

Three days after a blue SUV packed with 13 teenagers rolled over on a rural North Port road in early April, killing a 17-year-old North Port High School student, Mayor Christopher Hanks sighed, placed his head in his hands, and pleaded for something to be done about DUI fatalities that had claimed the lives of three residents in two weeks.

“Stuff like this rings home for me ... We’ve seen way too many deaths,” Hanks said, calling on the City Commission and Chris Morales, deputy chief of North Port Police Department, to increase efforts to show the dangers of DUI fatalities and the tangled lives they leave behind.

North Port increases DUI education after three fatal crashes

Source: Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters


Age ID

The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that it would permit the sale of IQOS, a “heat not burn” tobacco device made by Philip Morris International, in the United States.

While the agency stopped short of declaring that the device was safer than traditional cigarettes, the F.D.A. did say the heated tobacco-stick system could help people to quit smoking.

It differs from e-cigarettes already on the market because it contains tobacco rather than liquid nicotine. But IQOS still delivers an amount of nicotine that’s similar to traditional cigarettes.


F.D.A. Permits the Sale of IQOS, a New Tobacco Device

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 42

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Texas-based firm says private data of patients exposed - Emcare Inc. says an unauthorized third party gained access
  • Michigan Senate approves ban on e-cigarette sales to minors - The maximum fine was previously $50
  • California woman accused of stealing identities to buy Seahawks tickets, prosecutors say - Stolen credit card numbers and burner cellphones
  • Tobacco in the crosshairs - Never mind that voters rejected a similar idea just three years ago


Retail ID

A company that provides billing and other services to doctors and hospitals across the U.S. says a breach exposed personal data including Social Security numbers and clinical information about some patients.     

Emcare Inc. says an unauthorized third party gained access to the information through employee email accounts.     

Texas-based firm says private data of patients exposed


Age ID 

Legislation to keep electronic cigarettes out of the hands of minors moved forward Tuesday as the Michigan Senate unanimously adopted two bills restricting access to the devices.

Senate Bills 106 and 155 amend the Youth Tobacco Act to criminalize the sale of nicotine vapor products to anyone under the age of 18 and require child-resistant packaging on liquid nicotine containers. Minors would also be prohibited from possessing or using a vapor product or alternative nicotine product.

Michigan Senate approves ban on e-cigarette sales to minors


Retail ID

Renton police detectives are searching for a 29-year-old California woman who they say used stolen identities, stolen credit card numbers and burner cellphones to buy tens of thousands of dollars worth of Seattle Seahawks tickets last season.

Prosecutors said the scheme cost the team $43,000.

King County prosecutors said Sonovah Hillman allegedly stole the name of an Air Force pilot from Oklahoma and used stolen credit card data to buy tickets from the team. 

California woman accused of stealing identities to buy Seahawks tickets, prosecutors say


Age ID

Never mind that voters rejected a similar idea just three years ago, Gov. Jared Polis and some Democratic lawmakers want to try again with a ballot measure to increase cigarette taxes to pay for health care programs.

But unlike Amendment 72, which 53 percent of voters rejected in 2016, this proposal also would add a new tax on electronic cigarettes, also known as vaping.

The proposal calls for increasing the current 84-cent per-pack cigarette tax by $1.75, bringing it to $2.59 a pack. It also would impose a new 62 percent tax on the listed manufacturer's price of e-cigarettes, and raise taxes on other tobacco products, such as cigars and chewing tobacco, from the current 40 percent of the manufacture price, to 62 percent.


Tobacco in the crosshairs