Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 57

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Juul Shells Out $3 Million As San Francisco Vaping Ban Battle Intensifies - The money goes to the Coalition for Reasonable Vaping Regulation
  • UCF sorority placed on suspension after numerous allegations including underage drinking - 16 violations by Alpha Delta Pi
  • Around 100 New Jersey School Districts May Turn To Vape Detectors To Catch Students - Preparing for the new school year
  • Beware. Equifax settlement is spawning scams - There will be many email phishing attempts, telephone calls and probably gift-card scams

Age ID

Juul Labs injected $3 million in July into a campaign to undo its hometown’s looming e-cigarette ban, tripling the size of the campaign’s warchest.

“We are strongly supporting these efforts, as part of the growing Coalition for Reasonable Vaping Regulation, to enact strict new regulation and enforcement instead of a ban for all adults that will fuel a black market for vapor products and the increased use of deadly cigarettes,” Juul spokesperson Ted Kwong said in a statement. He added that the ballot measure recognizes “adult smokers should have access to alternatives since cigarettes still kill 40,000 Californians every year.”

Juul Shells Out $3 Million As San Francisco Vaping Ban Battle Intensifies

Age ID 

That sorority member, whose name has not been released, says in the sorority's group chat, there was talk of underage drinking, buying and selling of prescription pills, and girls offering to do other girls' homework for money -- but that was only the start of her concerns.

A 41-page redacted report obtained from UCF summarizes a long list of concerns.

Paperwork shows an Alpha Delta Pi sorority member sent a letter to fraternity and sorority life's director, Woody Joseph, on July 6, after she claimed that advisors, ADPi nationals, and her sorority's executive board did nothing.


UCF sorority placed on suspension after numerous allegations including underage drinking

Age ID

Many school districts are looking to install new technology in bathrooms called “HALO.” It detects all types of smoke, including vape with THC, regular smoke, carbon dioxide, propane, and even methane.

Manufactured by a company called IPVideo Corp., the devices are being used in 46 states and 10 school districts in New Jersey already, with nearly 100 more sending in requests.

In Sussex County, Sparta High School is the latest to receive a few pilot smart detectors to try out. Roy was told, however, that the school is still deciding if the technology will be permanently installed.


Around 100 New Jersey School Districts May Turn To Vape Detectors To Catch Students

Retail ID

Let me say this now, because I have no doubt that there will be many email phishing attempts, telephone calls and probably gift-card scams trying to capitalize on Equifax’s $700 million settlement with the Federal Trade Commission: If anyone calls or emails you about the settlement, do nothing — and I mean not a single thing — until you verify the information with the FTC or your state or local consumer-protection office.

The settlement specified that affected consumers were entitled to free credit monitoring paid for by Equifax, or they could choose what could have been a decent cash payment — up to $125 if they have credit monitoring elsewhere. The FTC has since said that, based on the level of interest in the cash, consumers are likely to get much smaller payments if they opt out of the free credit monitoring.


Beware. Equifax settlement is spawning scams

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 56

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • How the $700 million Equifax settlement could leave you high and dry - The perpetrators of the 2017 hack have yet to be identified
  • Arizona agency using app in hopes of preventing underage drinking - Self promotion! Age ID works!
  • Juul co-founder defends in congressional hearing over its alleged role in teen vaping ‘epidemic’ - Lawmakers grill Juul’s co-founder James Monsees
  • Woman gets fraudulent ID at PennDOT licensing center - Authorities say a woman received a duplicate copy of the victim’s license!

Retail ID

On a surface level, the settlement does provide some financial relief to these consumers. Every person can get up to $500 as reimbursement for the time spent “taking preventative measures or dealing with identity theft,” the court papers outlining the settlement said. Up to 10 hours can be self-certified, meaning no documentation is required, for $250 in relief.

Additionally, affected consumers can get four years of credit monitoring and identity protection from the three credit bureaus: Equifax EFX, -0.09% , ExperianEXPN, -2.56% and TransUnion TRU, -0.94%  . After that, Equifax is offering another six years of credit monitoring. Consumers who already have credit monitoring can instead opt to be paid $125, per the settlement.

How the $700 million Equifax settlement could leave you high and dry


Age ID 

The state agency in charge of regulating alcohol sales in Arizona is trying to prevent underage drinking by using an app to detect fake IDs.

The app is called Intellicheck.

“The officer or the store owner scans the back of the driver’s license, the barcode,” said Bryan Lewis, CEO of the company that created the app, explaining how it works.

He said the app then checks the barcode to ensure it “matches with 100 percent certainty the format for that state on that date of issuance.”


Arizona agency using app in hopes of preventing underage drinking

Age ID

Juul co-founder James Monsees defended the e-cigarette start-up in a congressional hearing Thursday, saying the company “never wanted” minors to use its products, while admitting the company made “missteps.”

The House Oversight committee’s Economic and Consumer Policy subcommittee called in Monsees and Ashley Gould, Juul’s chief administrative officer, to testify. Thursday marked the first time lawmakers publicly grilled Juul executives.


Juul co-founder defends e-cigarette start-up in congressional hearing over its alleged role in teen vaping ‘epidemic’


Retail ID

Authorities say a woman went into a PennDOT licensing center, pretended to be someone else, and received a duplicate copy of the victim’s license!

Manheim Township Police say 27-year-old Emily Ewan is on the run from authorities.

For them, it’s a pretty rare case of identity theft because of two things: the victim does not know the suspect at all and because of how easy it was for the suspect to receive a copy of the victim's license.


Police: Woman gets fraudulent ID at PennDOT licensing center

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 55

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • My Social Security data was hacked. Can yours be? - A hacker diverted a monthly direct deposit to someone else’s bank account.
  • Don’t Get Punked by Prime Day Package Delivery Scam - Be wary of unsolicited communications
  • Google expected to pay multimillion dollar penalty to settle into how YouTube handles kids' data - Collecting data under the age of 13
  • FDA uses magic tricks in first TV ads to prevent teens from vaping - FDA releases anti-vaping TV ads aimed at teens


Retail ID

A few weeks ago I received a letter from the Social Security Administration. By itself, this was neither alarming nor threatening. If you’re 65 or over (I am 73), you receive regular notices from Social Security.

The letter looked authentic -- and was. “Thank you for using Social Security’s online services,” it said. “On June 28, 2019, you successfully created an online account with the Social Security Administration.” This, too, seemed innocuous, except for one troubling detail: I didn’t create an online account with the Social Security Administration

My Social Security data was hacked. Can yours be?


Retail ID 

How to Avoid Package Delivery Scams

  • Be wary of unsolicited communications
  • Track your packages.
  • Never give your personal information to strangers.
  • Never click on links in unsolicited emails.


Don’t Get Punked by Prime Day Package Delivery Scam


Retail ID

This week, the FTC said it was launching its latest review of the children's privacy law -- abbreviated as COPPA -- asking the public to weigh in on more than two dozen questions pertaining to how the agency enforces the rules.

"The online environment for children continues to evolve at a rapid pace," the FTC said in its notice in the Federal Register, "including, for example, the significant increase in education technology in the classroom and social media and platforms with third-party content appealing to children."


Google expected to pay multimillion dollar penalty to settle investigation into how YouTube handles kids' data

Age ID

The effort is part of the FDA's "The Real Cost" youth e-cigarette prevention campaign, a $60 million initiative that launched last year through social media, digital content and posters at high schools nationwide. The campaign aims to reach almost 10.7 million students ages 12 to 17 who might be at risk of vaping or have already started.

The new ads feature street magician and social media personality Julius Dein performing illusions with people's vapes by appearing to turn them into traditional cigarettes. The FDA said they will run on networks including TeenNick, the CW, MTV and ESPN, in addition to streaming and social media sites.


FDA uses magic tricks in first TV ads to prevent teens from vaping

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 54

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • As Juul grapples with teen vaping ‘epidemic,’ CEO tells parents ‘I’m sorry’ - Former FDA Commissioner blames a teen vaping “epidemic” on Juul
  • Is your home still yours? Alleged SoCal scammers forged signatures to sell property- Check property records online every year
  • Teen’s Two-Pod A Day Juul Addiction Caused Massive Stroke, Lawsuit Says - The stroke required three brain surgeries
  • Federal Judge Instructs FDA To Impose 10-Month Deadline On E-Cigarette Applications - The ruling will have a negative effect on companies like Juul

Age ID

Since launching in 2015, Juul has quickly come to dominate the e-cigarette industry with roughly 40% of the market, becoming such a dominant player that Altria, the top U.S. cigarette company, invested $12.8 billion for a 35% stake in the San Francisco-based start-up. But the company has a problem: Its vapes are incredibly popular with teenagers.

The Food and Drug Administration has declared teen vaping an “epidemic,” citing federal survey data that showed nearly 21% of high school students vaped last year. Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb and health care advocates blame the surge in teen vaping on Juul.

As Juul grapples with teen vaping ‘epidemic,’ CEO tells parents ‘I’m sorry’

Retail ID 

A disbarred Los Angeles-area lawyer who has already served time for fraud is facing new charges along with two other suspects in connection with an elaborate alleged real-estate scam.

The three suspects are facing dozens of felony charges.

Angela Fawn Wallace, a disbarred lawyer with multiple arrests for fraud on her record, was allegedly involved in forgery, identity theft, money laundering and grand theft in connection with the scheme, detectives say.


Is your home still yours? Alleged SoCal scammers forged signatures to sell property, police say

Age ID

A Connecticut man is suing Juul Labs for causing him to suffer a massive stroke after he became addicted to the company’s products as a teenager. The case marks the first time the e-cigarette company has been sued for a medical issue this severe.

Maxwell Berger, 22, developed an addiction to Juul products during the summer of 2015 as he was finishing his last year of high school, the lawsuit says. By 2017, Berger was taking puffs of his Juul as often as every ten minutes, causing him to go through two cartridges every day. That July, Berger had a massive hemorrhagic stroke, which required three brain surgeries and more than 100 days in the hospital, the lawsuit states. It left him with “catastrophic and permanent injuries” such as left side paralysis, speech impairment and a 50% loss of vision from both eyes.


Teen’s Two-Pod A Day Juul Addiction Caused Massive Stroke, Lawsuit Says

Age ID

The shorter timeline was suggested by the FDA last month after a Maryland ruling on a lawsuit filed by anti-tobacco groups. The District Court ruled the FDA exceeded its authority when it decided to allow companies to continue selling e-cigarettes without regulatory approval until 2022.

United States District Judge Paul Grimm wrote in his judgment that he will establish a ten-month deadline for applications to be submitted and a year deadline for applications to be approved. Judge Grimm mentioned the availability of these products to the youth and a clear health emergency as two reasons for his decision.


Federal Judge Instructs FDA To Impose 10-Month Deadline On E-Cigarette Applications

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 53

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • New California vaping bill is a ruse for protecting Big Tobacco, health groups say - Health groups denounced as watered down and misdirected.
  • Maryland Grapples with Exposure of 78K Personal Records - Two databases used by the state’s Department of Labor may have been accessed
  • FDA forces some social media influencers to add warnings to posts after they advertise unsafe vape, e-liquid products - Only a matter of time
  • Former Gov. Pat McCrory said his identity was stolen while he was in office - Nobody is completely safe from identity theft. Even the governor.


Age ID

Two months after key lawmakers sidetracked a proposed ban on the sale of flavored tobacco products in California, an influential state legislator has quietly introduced a less restrictive measure that some health groups say is designed to protect electronic-cigarette makers.

The new proposal, which also targets marketing to youth, was announced by lawmakers led by Assemblyman Adam Gray (D-Merced), whose chairmanship of the powerful Assembly Governmental Organization Committee makes him a gatekeeper for all tobacco-related bills.

New California vaping bill is a ruse for protecting Big Tobacco, health groups say

Retail ID 

Two different databases with the state’s Department of Labor were potentially made available to unauthorized users, exposing the first and last names, birth dates, Social Security numbers, addresses and other personal information, the office reported Friday. 

The department's affected databases — the Literacy Works Information System (LWIS) and a legacy unemployment insurance service database — became the subject of an investigation by the Maryland Department of Information Technology (DoIT) earlier this year, after Labor officials voiced concern about a potential breach, the department said in a Friday press release. 


Maryland Grapples with Exposure of 78K Personal Records

Age ID

Some popular social media accounts are posting new warnings after a federal crackdown.

The Federal Trade Commission and the Food and Drug Administration are targeting accounts that promote and market vape and e-liquid products.

The agencies sent several letters to companies they said failed to disclose the health and safety risks of their products.

FDA forces some social media influencers to add warnings to posts after they advertise unsafe vape, e-liquid products

Source: www.wral.com

Retail ID

WCNC reports the FBI investigated and determined Russian hackers worked with a Florida couple to steal McCrory's information by filing a fraudulent tax return. In essence, they filed his return before he did, a common practice that happens in identity theft.

“Someone else did my taxes out of Florida as the governor of North Carolina and actually got a refund and it changed my life, because whenever I do my taxes I have to use a special security code," McCrory said on the show, according to WCNC.


Former Gov. Pat McCrory said his identity was stolen while he was in office