Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 20

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Juul Suspends Selling Most E-Cigarette Flavors in Stores - Juul will restrict sales of nearly all its flavored pods to the internet, and stop most social media promotion to combat youth vaping, bowing to government and public pressure.
  • Blu E-Cigarettes Will Make Changes To Reduce Teen Vaping - Blu reads the tea leaves and and adds age verification technology
  • Insecure Server Puts Two-Factor, Password Data of Millions at Risk - The risks of placing personal information on the web continues to be risky
  • IRS Failed to Track 11,000 Breached Social Security Numbers for Tax Fraud - The tax agency also failed to review another 15,000 breached ID numbers 

Joshua Bright for The New York Times

Age ID

Facing mounting government pressure and a public backlash over an epidemic of teenage vaping, Juul Labs announced on Tuesday that it would suspend sales of most of its flavored e-cigarette pods in retail stores and would discontinue its social media promotions.

The decision by the San Francisco-based company, which has more than 70 percent of the e-cigarette market share in the United States, is the most significant sign of retrenchment by an industry that set out to offer devices to help smokers quit but now shoulders blame for a new public health problem: nicotine addiction among nonsmoking teens.

Juul Suspends Selling Most E-Cigarette Flavors in Stores


Age ID

According to CNBC, the manufacturer of Blu e-cigarettes plans to raise the minimum age requirement to 21 to buy vape pods in the U.S. The company's CEO told the media outlet that it might also require online retailers to use age verification technology in order to stop minors from purchasing its products.

To the left is a longer story on the overall FDA issue from PBS. 

Blu E-Cigarettes Will Make Changes To Reduce Teen Vaping


Retail ID

Two-factor authentication (2FA) can be one of the best ways of securing your data; that is, unless the codes are kept on an insecure server, leaving millions of password-reset links, cell phone numbers, text message contents, and two-factor codes easily searchable and readable.

That's what Sébastien Kaul, a Berlin-based security researcher, discovered on a Voxox server, TechCrunch reports. Using Shodan, a database search engine, Kaul found that the Voxox server was wide open—no password required—and easily searchable.

Insecure Server Puts Two-Factor, Password Data of Millions at Risk

J. DAVID AKE/AP FILE PHOTO

Law ID

The IRS failed to add more than 11,000 compromised Social Security numbers to a list it uses to help protect taxpayers from identity theft, according to an audit this month from the Treasury Department’s internal watchdog.

Fraudsters used 79 of those Social Security numbers to file phony tax returns in an effort to receive ill-gotten refunds during the 2016 and 2017 tax years, Treasury’s inspector general found.

IRS Failed to Track 11,000 Breached Social Security Numbers for Tax Fraud

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 19

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • 19 charged during drinking crackdown at SPAC - Age ID continues to pay dividends in NY State
  • Phantom Renters And Scammers Equal Serious Losses For Landlords - Learn about the dangers of synthetic fraud
  • Vaping is an epidemic and the FDA must act, physicians say - The nation’s physicians sent a strong message on “the urgent public health epidemic”
  • Scams and schemes create enforcement morass at ports - The challenge for law enforcement is separating legitimate shipments from illegal ones


Age ID

Officials said the crackdown is part of Operation Prevent, a DMV initiative conducted all year long that targets not only bars and drinking establishments but concerts, events, and other underage hot spots. During an Operation Prevent sting, DMV investigators work with the state Liquor Authority and law enforcement to check identification documents. Patrons found to be using fake IDs can be arrested and have their license revoked for a minimum of 90 days or up to one year.

19 charged during drinking crackdown at Saratoga PAC


Retail ID

A full 75% of those landlords were unaware of the scam until after move-in, only noticing when a rent payment was missed or another issue occurred. More than a quarter didn’t notice until seven months later or more.

By then, thousands of dollars in rent and other costs have already been lost. According to TransUnion data, an average of $4,215 is owed per fraudulent tenant, and that doesn’t even include the costs to evict, the lost rent during the months-long eviction process and the additional costs of marketing, readying and re-leasing the property.

Phantom Renters And Scammers Equal Serious Losses For Landlords


Age ID

To address the issue, the AMA House of Delegates directed the AMA to:

  • Recognize the use of e-cigarettes and vaping as an urgent public health epidemic.
  • Actively work with the Food and Drug Administration and other relevant stakeholders to counteract the marketing and use of addictive e-cigarette and vaping devices, including but not limited to bans and strict restrictions on marketing to minors under the age of 21.

Vaping is an epidemic and the FDA must act, physicians say


Law ID

The insurance crime bureau is a nonprofit agency that works with law enforcement and the insurance industry to prevent theft and fraud. Koven and Bealey are embedded with CBP's local auto desk and have helped train officers in how to detect signs of vehicle theft in export paperwork.

Their challenge is separating legitimate shipments from illegal ones in the murky area between criminal fraud and breach of private contracts, in which automakers try to discourage the export of new vehicles bought at U.S. dealerships and criminals try to sneak vehicles out of the country in violation of a law that bans exports of vehicles with pending liens.

Scams and schemes create enforcement morass at ports

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 18

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Whitesboro School Officials Hope To Combat The Use Of E-Cigarettes In Its Schools - Detection devices can limit use in schools
  • Fairfield Universirty DPS to Use New ID Check Software - See how Fairfield's student newspaper reported on Age ID 
  • NY announces results of underage drinking crackdown - Gov Cuomo implemented Age ID to assist in these efforts. The results are in!
  • $1.1 Million Nationwide Fraud Scheme Targeting Casinos and Credit Card Companies - False identities of migrant workers used


Age ID

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, e-cigarettes are now the most commonly used tobacco product among youth.

It is great to see school officials getting serious about the dangers of vaping. Vaping detectors are a great step forward. We also prefer preventing our youth from being able to purchase the products. Intellicheck's Age ID can limit the ability of underage youth from purchasing e-cigarettes.

Whitesboro School Officials Hope To Combat The Use Of E-Cigarettes In Its Schools

Age ID

​The Department of Public Safety is implementing a new system to check identification cards at various events and areas on campus. The system, created by the company Intellicheck, is called Age ID and makes it easier than ever for campus officers to spot fake IDs.

The system comes in the form of an application for mobile devices such as iPhones or iPads and will be placed in every DPS patrol car on campus. The application not only quickly identifies the validity of the license, but also allows officers to see how many times the ID was scanned. This means that, at future events, there will be no more ability for students to sneakily pass IDs back to their friends in line.

DPS to Use New ID Check Software


Law ID

Back in August, New York's DMV became the first in the nation to pilot Law ID statewide in a crackdown on underage drinking. We are happy that we could assist the state in their efforts to combat this epidemic. 

Establishments selling age restricted products would be wise to implement our Age ID product that utilizes the same technology as law enforcement.

NY announces results of underage drinking crackdown


Retail ID

According to court documents, between August 2008 and August 2014, Wang participated in a scheme to defraud casinos and credit card companies across the country. The scheme involved using false identities in the names and Social Security numbers of migrant workers to apply for casino credit called “markers” and to open credit card accounts. A marker is a cash advance provided by a casino to a patron, and it is often secured by a check from the patron’s bank account.

Defendant in $1.1 Million Nationwide Fraud Scheme Targeting Casinos and Credit Card Companies Is Sentenced

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 17

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Marin County tobacco shops caught in middle of vaping battle - Blanket restrictions  hurt tobacco shops
  • N. Fulton teen falls unconscious after vaping at school, police say  - Vaping is not a safe alternative in all situations
  • Juul Offered To Pay Schools As Much As $20,000 To Blame Vaping On Peer Pressure - Much criticized program to curb teen us
  • Men convicted of identity theft, including purchase of a van from Modesto dealership - Mail theft is a big driver in identity theft


Age ID

It's a throwback to an earlier era - Telford's Pipe and Cigar in Mill Valley, here smoke hangs heavy, and worry as well.

"My livelihood of 45 years is in jeopardy," said Brian Telford. He's a Vietnam veteran and bronze star winner who has created a safe haven for tobacco lovers. Tomorrow, he says, the Marin County Board of Supervisors could ruin him.

Marin County tobacco shops caught in middle of vaping battle

Age ID

An Alpharetta student fell ill and became unconscious at school after using a vape pen at school, Channel 2 Action News reported.  A student was using the vape pen at Kings Ridge Christian School on Thursday when he began to get sick, Alpharetta police told Channel 2.

“The student had been smoking the vape liquid, became very sick, became unconscious and was transported to the hospital," said Officer Howard Miller, a spokesman for the police department.

N. Fulton teen falls unconscious after vaping at school, police say

Age ID

Juul offered a number of schools and public school systems stipends of as much as $20,000 to adopt a vaping curriculum to be taught by Juul consultants, according to information from multiple school districts reviewed by BuzzFeed News.

The ill-fated curriculum, which Juul pulled in mid-May, recently came under fire in an article published this month in the Journal of Adolescent Health that claims Juul failed to emphasize the harms caused by flavored pods and omitted information about how the e-cigarette industry markets to teens, the authors said.

Juul Offered To Pay Schools As Much As $20,000 To Blame Vaping On Peer Pressure


Retail ID

Federal prosecutors said Hillgert and Wilhite stole mail and used the identifying information to conduct fraudulent transactions. When the defendants were arrested, they had more than 200 pieces of stolen mail belonging to more than 100 victims, according to the news release.

Wilhite helped Hillgert use a stolen identity to create a phony driver’s license but with Hilgert’s photograph, the prosecutors said. Hillgert then used the fake license to obtain a loan in the identity theft victim’s name to buy the $39,000 van, according to the news release.

Men convicted of identity theft, including purchase of a van from Modesto dealership

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 16

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • As vaping surges, teen cigarette smoking ticks up after decades of decline - Up to 8.1% from 7.6% last year
  • Man Steals $13,000 in Jewelry From Vending Machine  - Is it crazy to put jewelry in a vending machine?
  • Schools, health department launch new programs to curb teen vaping in Arizona - Schools need to be more proactive to combat this epidemic.
  • Apple CEO Calls For Laws Curbing 'Data Industrial Complex' - Do we need comprehensive federal privacy law reform?


Age ID

  • This year, 8.1 percent of high school students reported smoking cigarettes, up from 7.6 percent last year, according to preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's annual National Youth Tobacco Survey.
  • Teen smoking rates have plummeted since peaking in 1997 when 36.4 percent of high school kids smoked cigarettes.
  • One e-cigarette brand in particular, Juul, has become a target of parents, teachers and now regulators.

As vaping surges, teen cigarette smoking ticks up after decades of decline


Retail ID

When designer Marla Aaron set up a vending machine featuring her jewelry in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, N.Y., offering items ranging from $100 to $1,500, videos on her site proclaimed “it’s crazy to put jewelry in a vending machine.”

Unfortunately, that has proven all too true. On Sept. 20 at 1:15 p.m., a man (pictured) used fraudulent credit cards to purchase approximately $13,000 worth of jewelry from the machine. The New York City Police Department is now seeking his arrest for grand larceny.

Man Steals $13,000 in Jewelry From Vending Machine


Age ID

Officials with the Cave Creek Unified School District confirmed that more students are vaping or using e-cigarettes, and it's getting harder to catch because of sleek brands like Juul, which are disguised as flash drives.

The principal of Cactus Shadows High School says students caught have to take a three-day course on vaping and its risks. Parents say they were made aware of this alarming trend from their children's schools.

Schools, health department launch new programs to curb teen vaping in Arizona


Retail ID

Federal lawmakers should pass privacy legislation that would give consumers a new set of rights, including the right to “have personal data minimized,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said today at a privacy conference in Brussels.

"We at Apple are in full support of a comprehensive federal privacy law in the United States," Cook said. He went on to propose four “essential rights” for consumers, including the rights to data minimization and the right to access data collected about them.

In a 22-minute speech, Cook criticized the “data industrial complex,” stating that personal information "is being weaponized against us with military efficiency."

Apple CEO Calls For Laws Curbing 'Data Industrial Complex'