Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 69

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Community must get a handle on underage drinking - Alcohol remains the drug of choice among America’s teenagers
  • San Jose woman guilty of identity theft - Pet-sitter, vet clinic employee admits to stealing ID information from clients
  • Some States With Legal Weed Embrace Vaping Bans, Warn Of Black Market Risks - Warning customers of "severe lung injuries" and "deaths"
  • Should you worry about Facebook identity thieves? - What do you need to know, and how can you protect yourself?

Age ID

We see it in the news all the time: another young adult’s future comprised by alcohol. Whether it’s academic failure, involvement with law enforcement, experience with violence, or sexual assault, the consequences of underage drinking for young adults and the community at large are severe. While the rate of alcohol use is going down, the truth is alcohol remains the drug of choice among America’s teenagers.

An underage drinking prevention event is being hosted by Alcohol and Drug Services of Gallatin County in collaboration with the Substance Abuse Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA). The focus is on improving the future of youth in Gallatin County; especially during Red Ribbon Week.

Community must get a handle on underage drinking

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Rose Marie Segale, 41, faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in a federal prison after entering her pleas in U.S. District Court, U.S. Attorney McGregor Scott of the Eastern District of California said. Segale also pleaded guilty to access device fraud, he said.

Court documents showed that Segale used her job at the vet clinic and her pet-sitting work to obtain the personal and financial information of her clients, Scott said. She provided that information to Marie Antoinette Alcanter, a co-defendant who used the information to make purchases and withdrawals from the accounts of those clients, Scott said.

Alcanter is alleged to have obtained more than $40,000 worth of items and cash using the identity of others, authorities said.

San Jose woman guilty of identity theft

Age ID

Around Washington state, cannabis shops are being required to hang signs warning customers of "severe lung injuries" and "deaths" associated with vaping.

Kevin Heiderich, a co-owner of one such shop, House of Cannabis in Tacoma, Wash., believes the government response to vaping illnesses should focus on the black market.

"Something has just changed and no one really knows what it is," he says.

Still, Heiderich supports more rigorous testing so the regulated market is perceived as safer. This summer, his shops began contacting all their suppliers to verify what's in their products.

Some States With Legal Weed Embrace Vaping Bans, Warn Of Black Market Risks

Retail ID

Imagine receiving a sudden flurry of messages from friends and family members alerting you that someone is posing as you. After the initial shock, you might wonder why an individual would go to the trouble of setting up a fake profile that uses your name and other identifying details.

As banks and other financial institutions have become better at spotting fake identities, scammers have turned to using the identities of real people for a variety of purposes, including opening lines of credit and draining bank accounts. Setting up a Facebook profile can be one step in establishing ownership of an identity — especially if the scammer can manage to get the real identity owner locked out of their account in the process.

Should you worry about Facebook identity thieves?

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 68

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • 7-year-old caught vaping CBD at school - He said he got the vape device from his mother’s purse.
  • Police: Hundreds of citations issued for underage drinking and fake IDs in Bryn Mawr - Age ID solves these types of problems
  • Georgia ranks among top states for identity theft and fraud - Since the CDC launched its investigation
  • What Is Identity Theft Insurance, and Should You Get It? - But is it worth buying?

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More and more, it seems that protecting your personal data comes at a premium. From financial institutions like Capital One to social media networks like Facebook, a number of high-profile companies have fallen prey to hackers recently.

That includes the massive 2017 data breach of Equifax, the Atlanta-based credit reporting agency. That breach alone compromised the data of 147 million people, according to the Federal Trade Commission

Even as companies take a more pointed approach to protecting data, the trend continues: One recent report found more than 10,000 breaches occurred between Jan. 1, 2005, and Aug. 31, 2019.

Georgia ranks among top states for identity theft and fraud


Age ID

While cannabis will likely be a massive industry, these newly public companies are still learning how to manage Wall Street expectations—and that has been a “painful learning process,” Markiewicz says.

“In the long run, [the vaping crisis] is just a bump in the road,” says Morningstar analyst Kristoffer Inton, who predicts that the real growth opportunity for cannabis companies is in the underdeveloped derivatives market, such as edibles and beverages.

Top Cannabis Companies Have Lost Almost $10 Billion In Market Value Since Vaping Crisis Began

Retail ID

Identity theft is a common problem affecting millions of Americans. In fact, according to a 2016 Bureau of Justice Statistics survey, approximately 10% of people over 16 reported that they'd been the victim of some type of identity theft in 2016

There are many types of identity theft. Often, the perpetrator misuses your personal information to open credit cards in your name or gets hold of your existing credit cards and makes unauthorized charges. Whatever form it takes, identity theft could cost you money and time.

What Is Identity Theft Insurance, and Should You Get It?

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 67

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • 7-year-old caught vaping CBD at school - He said he got the vape device from his mother’s purse.
  • Police: Man used mother's work laptop to commit identity theft, fraud - Accessed accounts and fraudulently transferred money
  • Top Cannabis Companies Have Lost Almost $10 Billion In Market Value Since Vaping Crisis Began - Since the CDC launched its investigation
  • What Is Identity Theft Insurance, and Should You Get It? - But is it worth buying?

Age ID

The boy’s mother told investigators the vape device contained CBD oil.

“I’m sure she regrets leaving it in her purse where he could get ahold of it,” Hearold said. “I guess I really hadn’t thought too much about my elementary school students being in contact with a vaping device. I don’t think they would know what to do with it.”

A social worker from Child Protective Services picked up the child from school and took him to Children’s Hospital to get checked out.

7-year-old caught vaping CBD at school

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Keizer Police said they first learned about this case in April after Homeside Financial, LLC reported the company was the victim of a data compromise. Two company employees had reported that accounts were being opened in their names and someone was fraudulently routing money to various accounts.

After investigating further, the company discovered that an employee’s laptop was used to obtain unauthorized files from Homeside’s file server. They also learned the fraudulent connections that were made originated from the router in that employee’s Keizer home.

Police: Man used mother's work laptop to commit identity theft, fraud


Age ID

While cannabis will likely be a massive industry, these newly public companies are still learning how to manage Wall Street expectations—and that has been a “painful learning process,” Markiewicz says.

“In the long run, [the vaping crisis] is just a bump in the road,” says Morningstar analyst Kristoffer Inton, who predicts that the real growth opportunity for cannabis companies is in the underdeveloped derivatives market, such as edibles and beverages.

Top Cannabis Companies Have Lost Almost $10 Billion In Market Value Since Vaping Crisis Began

Retail ID

Identity theft is a common problem affecting millions of Americans. In fact, according to a 2016 Bureau of Justice Statistics survey, approximately 10% of people over 16 reported that they'd been the victim of some type of identity theft in 2016

There are many types of identity theft. Often, the perpetrator misuses your personal information to open credit cards in your name or gets hold of your existing credit cards and makes unauthorized charges. Whatever form it takes, identity theft could cost you money and time.

What Is Identity Theft Insurance, and Should You Get It?

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 66

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Sky Bar and Envi Ultra Lounge get six months to make nightclubs safer - Montgomery PD asked the city to revoke their business licenses
  • The Hidden Dangers in Your Phone Number - Identity theft isn’t usually something that keeps people up at night
  • Arkansas AG sues online retailers for selling vaping products to minors - Legal action against three online e-cigarette retailers
  • 4 suspects accused of stealing nearly $500K in identity theft scheme - Your mailbox should be secure; your identity, sacred

Age ID

Two popular nightclubs have been given six months to make their establishments safer after the Montgomery Police Department asked the city to revoke their business licenses.

MPD gave the Montgomery City Council a detailed breakdown of crime at Sky Bar and Envi Ultra Lounge about two weeks ago. A memorandum said the two establishments had histories of stabbings, shootings, underage drinking and more than 100 police calls this year.

Sky Bar and Envi Ultra Lounge get six months to make nightclubs safer 

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Identity theft isn’t usually something that keeps people up at night. It should, argues the former Atlantic writer Taylor Lorenz: “You don’t ever worry about it until it happens to you.”

In a new episode of The Idea File, Lorenz explains how giving out your phone number could lead to a devastating hack—even when your phone is sitting in your pocket. She also offers guidance on how to better inoculate yourself against exposing sensitive personal data.

The Hidden Dangers in Your Phone Number

TONY CENICOLA/THE NEW YORK TIMES/REDUX


Age ID

“These out-of-state retailers are illegally selling vaping products online that are dangerous to Arkansas children, and it’s time to take a strong stance to stop this practice in our state,” said Attorney General Rutledge. “It is unacceptable for retailers to exploit our youth by selling vaping products to them illegally.”

General Rutledge filed lawsuits today against Utah-based BuyVapor.com, Arizona-based The Vape Co. and Minnesota-based Mystic Juice USA, LLC. All three companies were reported to sell and ship vape products to customers in Arkansas and failed to confirm the consumers’ age.

Arkansas AG sues online retailers for selling vaping products to minors


Retail ID

Prosecutors said the suspects would steal people's mail, real estate listings and other public records.

Federal documents show they then used that information and their own pictures to create fake government IDs.

Prosecutors said they'd go to places like Lowes and Target and get credit cards in other people's names.

Prosecutors said they'd even buy luxury cars.

4 suspects accused of stealing nearly $500K in identity theft scheme

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 65

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Death toll climbs from vaping illnesses as Florida, Georgia report new fatalities - The Georgia patient had a history of heavy nicotine vaping
  • DoorDash suffered a data breach that affected 4.9 million people - DoorDash said it noticed unusual activity from a third-party service provider
  • Two men charged with in underage drinking party in Farmington - Of the 15 to 20 people in the apartment, eight were under age 21 
  • Americans’ readiness for Real ID in doubt as 2020 deadline nears - Nearly 40 percent of Americans don’t have a Real ID

TONY CENICOLA/THE NEW YORK TIMES/REDUX


Age ID

Georgia and Florida health officials have both reported their first vaping-related deaths, bringing the total number of U.S. fatalities from a lung disease that resembles a rare form of pneumonia to at least 11.

Georgia is investigating nine cases, including the deceased patient. Most of the patients are men, ranging from 18 to 68 years old, with a median age of 26, the Georgia Department of Public Health said Wednesday. Florida’s Department of Health said on Tuesday it had 27 cases.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week said the mysterious lung disease has sickened 530 people across the U.S. Hundreds more have been reported in recent days, a CDC official told U.S. lawmakers at a hearing Tuesday. Kansas reported its second vaping-related death on Monday

Death toll climbs from vaping illnesses as Florida, Georgia report new fatalities

Retail ID 

DoorDash confirmed it suffered a data breach affecting roughly 4.9 million delivery people and merchants.

In a blog post on Thursday, DoorDash said it noticed unusual activity from a third-party service provider earlier in September. After investigating the activity, it found an unauthorized third party was able to access DoorDash user data on May 4, 2019. DoorDash said it took immediate steps to block further access and improve security.

The people affected joined DoorDash on or before April 5, 2018 — people who joined after that date weren't affected, according to the blog post. The company said it will be notifying those who were.

DoorDash suffered a data breach that affected 4.9 million people

Age ID

Two men have been charged with holding an underage drinking party at their apartment at 121 Middle St. late Friday night, Deputy Police Chief Shane Cote said.

Jean-Pierre T. Tshamala Jr., 21, was arrested on a charge of furnishing a place for minors to consume or possess alcohol, Cote said, and Najee M. Jean-Louis, 21, was issued a summons on the same charge.

When police responded to a report of a loud party at 11:30 p.m., they found several people hiding in rooms, including a bedroom and bathroom, Cote said, according to Sgt. Edward Hastings IV’s report.

Two men charged with in underage drinking party in Farmington

Retail ID

Americans are nowhere near ready for full implementation of the Real ID Act, set to take effect at U.S. airports a year from now, according to a survey.

Nearly 40 percent of Americans don’t have a Real ID or any of the other forms of identification that will be required at airport security checkpoints come fall 2020, according to the survey by the U.S. Travel Association.

Even more troubling, the survey found, a majority of Americans — 57 percent — are not aware that beginning Oct. 1, 2020, the only driver’s licenses that will be accepted for boarding commercial flights will be those that meet federal Real ID requirements.


Americans’ readiness for Real ID in doubt as 2020 deadline nears