Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Community must get a handle on underage drinking - Alcohol remains the drug of choice among America’s teenagers
  • San Jose woman guilty of identity theft - Pet-sitter, vet clinic employee admits to stealing ID information from clients
  • Some States With Legal Weed Embrace Vaping Bans, Warn Of Black Market Risks - Warning customers of "severe lung injuries" and "deaths"
  • Should you worry about Facebook identity thieves? - What do you need to know, and how can you protect yourself?

Age ID

We see it in the news all the time: another young adult’s future comprised by alcohol. Whether it’s academic failure, involvement with law enforcement, experience with violence, or sexual assault, the consequences of underage drinking for young adults and the community at large are severe. While the rate of alcohol use is going down, the truth is alcohol remains the drug of choice among America’s teenagers.

An underage drinking prevention event is being hosted by Alcohol and Drug Services of Gallatin County in collaboration with the Substance Abuse Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA). The focus is on improving the future of youth in Gallatin County; especially during Red Ribbon Week.

Community must get a handle on underage drinking

Retail ID 

Rose Marie Segale, 41, faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in a federal prison after entering her pleas in U.S. District Court, U.S. Attorney McGregor Scott of the Eastern District of California said. Segale also pleaded guilty to access device fraud, he said.

Court documents showed that Segale used her job at the vet clinic and her pet-sitting work to obtain the personal and financial information of her clients, Scott said. She provided that information to Marie Antoinette Alcanter, a co-defendant who used the information to make purchases and withdrawals from the accounts of those clients, Scott said.

Alcanter is alleged to have obtained more than $40,000 worth of items and cash using the identity of others, authorities said.

San Jose woman guilty of identity theft

Age ID

Around Washington state, cannabis shops are being required to hang signs warning customers of "severe lung injuries" and "deaths" associated with vaping.

Kevin Heiderich, a co-owner of one such shop, House of Cannabis in Tacoma, Wash., believes the government response to vaping illnesses should focus on the black market.

"Something has just changed and no one really knows what it is," he says.

Still, Heiderich supports more rigorous testing so the regulated market is perceived as safer. This summer, his shops began contacting all their suppliers to verify what's in their products.

Some States With Legal Weed Embrace Vaping Bans, Warn Of Black Market Risks

Retail ID

Imagine receiving a sudden flurry of messages from friends and family members alerting you that someone is posing as you. After the initial shock, you might wonder why an individual would go to the trouble of setting up a fake profile that uses your name and other identifying details.

As banks and other financial institutions have become better at spotting fake identities, scammers have turned to using the identities of real people for a variety of purposes, including opening lines of credit and draining bank accounts. Setting up a Facebook profile can be one step in establishing ownership of an identity — especially if the scammer can manage to get the real identity owner locked out of their account in the process.

Should you worry about Facebook identity thieves?