Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • CDC narrows investigation of mysterious vaping-related lung disease to 380 cases - At least six people have died from the illness
  • Senate chairman worried ‘Real ID’ will shock air travelers - Airport security set to require enhanced driver’s licenses in one year
  • Congresswoman Calls for Ban on Vaping Products - There have been hundreds of reports of lung-related health issues 
  • Here’s how to claim your $100 from Yahoo’s massive data breach settlement - Yahoo is close to reaching a $117.5 million settlement

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U.S. health officials have narrowed their investigation of a mysterious lung disease that has killed at least six people to 380 “probable” and “confirmed” cases, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

Doctors suspect vaping as a possible cause of the illnesses, which are spread out over 36 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The CDC said it’s homed in on the 380 likely or confirmed cases, instead of the more than 450 “possible” illnesses it was reviewing last week. It will no longer release data on cases that are less certain, the agency said.

CDC narrows investigation of mysterious vaping-related lung disease to 380 cases

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A post-9/11 law designed to keep people from using fake IDs to board airplanes is one year away from taking effect, but the chairman of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee worries that it’s destined to create “Y2K-type disruption” at the nation’s airports in October 2020.

Even though most states are issuing Real IDs — enhanced driver’s licenses required with the passage of a 2005 law  — Mississippi Republican Roger Wicker said he worries passengers who don’t have them and don’t know they need them will be caught by surprise on Oct. 1, 2020, when airports begin requiring the enhanced identification to pass through security.


Senate chairman worried ‘Real ID’ will shock air travelers

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Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro made an impassioned plea to the FDA Friday to remove all e-cigarettes and vaping products from the market.

Thursday the Connecticut Department of Public Health said there are six new cases of lung-related health issues believed to be connected to vaping, bringing the total in the state to 11. There have been hundreds of cases reported nationwide including six deaths, and no one seems to know what the cause is.


Congresswoman Calls for Ban on Vaping Products


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The class-action lawsuit comes after several major data breaches or “data security intrusions” — essentially when a hacker got into the system but didn’t take any information — that plagued Yahoo over the course of several years. Yahoo sent out an email about the settlement on Wednesday, detailing all the of the breaches that happened over the years.

In 2012, two different hackers accessed Yahoo’s internal systems, but didn’t take anything. In 2013, ”malicious actors” got into the company’s database and took records from all of Yahoo’s accounts — roughly 3 billion in all. The hackers behind that breach could have gotten into users’ email accounts, calendars, and contacts.


Here’s how to claim your $100 from Yahoo’s massive data breach settlement