Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • 19-year-old drops lawsuit against Juul, Philip Morris over marketing to young people - Lawsuit dropped on Wednesday two days after filing it
  • US troops may be victims of massive credit card hack in South Korea, military says - The thefts targeted unspecified business and financial entities
  • How To Build A Zero-Tolerance Culture For Employee Theft - Restaurant Business Online with some good advice
  • College students at high risk for identity theft: BBB - She used counterfeit credit cards while at the Seminole Hard Rock Casino


Age ID

An Illinois teenager dropped a lawsuit on Wednesday against e-cigarette maker Juul and tobacco giant Philip Morris two days after filing it.

The lawsuit, filed in federal court in Illinois on Monday by 19-year old Christian Foss, claimed the companies use illegal and deceptive marketing to prey on young people.

On Wednesday, Foss filed a notice of voluntary dismissal, and Judge Jorge L. Alonso dismissed the case without prejudice.

19-year-old drops lawsuit against Juul, Philip Morris over marketing to young people

Retail ID 

American troops may have been among the victims of hackers who stole information from more than 1 million U.S. and South Korean credit cards and listed it for sale on the dark web over the past three months, the military said.

The thefts targeted unspecified business and financial entities in South Korea and included information on at least 38,000 U.S.-issued payment cards, according to an alert distributed by the Eighth Army via its Facebook page on Monday.

An unnamed credit union that provides services at U.S. Air Force bases in South Korea was among the potentially compromised organizations, it said.


US troops may be victims of massive credit card hack in South Korea, military says

Age ID

Question: My underage dishwasher helped himself to a shift beer from the tap while my bar manager looked the other way. Who is at fault and what should I do about it?

Answer:
Both employees are at fault. First, they stole from the operation. Even if you offer a shift drink (a dying practice), you certainly did not offer an alcoholic one to a minor. 


How To Build A Zero-Tolerance Culture For Employee Theft

Retail ID

If you're getting ready to send your kid off to college, you've likely talked to them about responsibility, getting to class on time and safety. The Better Business Bureau of Greater Maryland suggests adding identity theft to the list.

The BBB said 41 percent of students report a financial loss when exposed to a scam.

College life is a big, exciting step into independence, which is one reason advocacy groups like the Better Business Bureau suggest every student get a crash course in avoiding scams 101.


College students at high risk for identity theft: BBB