Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Health advocates push Denver to raise tobacco purchase age to fight “growing epidemic” of teen vaping - Tobacco still 18 years of age
  • Colorado Springs ID theft case could have at least 123 victims - Woman in possession of counterfeit money, forged IDs, credit cards and checks
  • E-cigarette giant Juul accused of marketing to teens in new lawsuit - Violating the Illinois Consumer Fraud and Deceptive Business Practices Act
  • Holiday Woman Sentenced To Federal Prison For Identity Theft - She used counterfeit credit cards while at the Seminole Hard Rock Casino


Age ID

A coalition of health professionals, education leaders and student advocates on Tuesday argued forcefully for raising the legal age to purchase tobacco in Denver, warning that skyrocketing e-cigarette use has sparked a teen health crisis in Colorado.

If taken up and adopted by the Denver City Council, the “Tobacco 21” proposal would raise the sales age of tobacco to 21 from 18, while adding a citywide licensing and enforcement system that would bring cigarettes in line with alcohol and marijuana.

Health advocates push Denver to raise tobacco purchase age to fight “growing epidemic” of teen vaping


Retail ID 

Colorado Springs police and postal inspectors made an arrest in an alleged identity theft case that officials say could have more 123 victims, the agencies said Tuesday.

A woman, whose name was not released by authorities, was in possession of counterfeit money, forged identification cards, credit cards and checks, police said. Officers claim she had personal identifying information and documents of scores of victims from across the United States.


Police: Colorado Springs ID theft case could have at least 123 victims

Age ID

In the lawsuit, the Lake County State's Attorney Michael G. Nerheim also accuses Juul of violating the Prevention of Tobacco Use by Minors and Sale and Distribution of Tobacco Products Act by allegedly marketing to teens. 

"Just like cigarette companies did in the past, Juul preyed on teens by using advertisements that glamorized their product in order to get kids hooked on nicotine," said Nerheim said in a statement. "It will take years of education and money to right the wrongs and cover the damages caused by Juul's marketing campaigns. To that end, the company should be held accountable for the massive expected cost to undo the damage they created."


Around 100 New Jersey School Districts May Turn To Vape Detectors To Catch Students


Retail ID

A Holiday woman has been sentenced for federal prison after she used counterfeit credit cards while at the Seminole Hard Rock Casino, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Florida.

Catherine Trinidad De Jesus Santana, 43, of Holiday, was sentenced to three years in federal prison for access device (credit card) fraud and aggravated identity theft stemming from De Jesus Santana’s use of counterfeit credit cards at the Seminole Hard Rock Casino on the Seminole Indian Reservation in Tampa.


Holiday Woman Sentenced To Federal Prison For Identity Theft