Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • How the $700 million Equifax settlement could leave you high and dry - The perpetrators of the 2017 hack have yet to be identified
  • Arizona agency using app in hopes of preventing underage drinking - Self promotion! Age ID works!
  • Juul co-founder defends in congressional hearing over its alleged role in teen vaping ‘epidemic’ - Lawmakers grill Juul’s co-founder James Monsees
  • Woman gets fraudulent ID at PennDOT licensing center - Authorities say a woman received a duplicate copy of the victim’s license!

Retail ID

On a surface level, the settlement does provide some financial relief to these consumers. Every person can get up to $500 as reimbursement for the time spent “taking preventative measures or dealing with identity theft,” the court papers outlining the settlement said. Up to 10 hours can be self-certified, meaning no documentation is required, for $250 in relief.

Additionally, affected consumers can get four years of credit monitoring and identity protection from the three credit bureaus: Equifax EFX, -0.09% , ExperianEXPN, -2.56% and TransUnion TRU, -0.94%  . After that, Equifax is offering another six years of credit monitoring. Consumers who already have credit monitoring can instead opt to be paid $125, per the settlement.

How the $700 million Equifax settlement could leave you high and dry


Age ID 

The state agency in charge of regulating alcohol sales in Arizona is trying to prevent underage drinking by using an app to detect fake IDs.

The app is called Intellicheck.

“The officer or the store owner scans the back of the driver’s license, the barcode,” said Bryan Lewis, CEO of the company that created the app, explaining how it works.

He said the app then checks the barcode to ensure it “matches with 100 percent certainty the format for that state on that date of issuance.”


Arizona agency using app in hopes of preventing underage drinking

Age ID

Juul co-founder James Monsees defended the e-cigarette start-up in a congressional hearing Thursday, saying the company “never wanted” minors to use its products, while admitting the company made “missteps.”

The House Oversight committee’s Economic and Consumer Policy subcommittee called in Monsees and Ashley Gould, Juul’s chief administrative officer, to testify. Thursday marked the first time lawmakers publicly grilled Juul executives.


Juul co-founder defends e-cigarette start-up in congressional hearing over its alleged role in teen vaping ‘epidemic’


Retail ID

Authorities say a woman went into a PennDOT licensing center, pretended to be someone else, and received a duplicate copy of the victim’s license!

Manheim Township Police say 27-year-old Emily Ewan is on the run from authorities.

For them, it’s a pretty rare case of identity theft because of two things: the victim does not know the suspect at all and because of how easy it was for the suspect to receive a copy of the victim's license.


Police: Woman gets fraudulent ID at PennDOT licensing center