Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • My Social Security data was hacked. Can yours be? - A hacker diverted a monthly direct deposit to someone else’s bank account.
  • Don’t Get Punked by Prime Day Package Delivery Scam - Be wary of unsolicited communications
  • Google expected to pay multimillion dollar penalty to settle into how YouTube handles kids' data - Collecting data under the age of 13
  • FDA uses magic tricks in first TV ads to prevent teens from vaping - FDA releases anti-vaping TV ads aimed at teens


Retail ID

A few weeks ago I received a letter from the Social Security Administration. By itself, this was neither alarming nor threatening. If you’re 65 or over (I am 73), you receive regular notices from Social Security.

The letter looked authentic -- and was. “Thank you for using Social Security’s online services,” it said. “On June 28, 2019, you successfully created an online account with the Social Security Administration.” This, too, seemed innocuous, except for one troubling detail: I didn’t create an online account with the Social Security Administration

My Social Security data was hacked. Can yours be?


Retail ID 

How to Avoid Package Delivery Scams

  • Be wary of unsolicited communications
  • Track your packages.
  • Never give your personal information to strangers.
  • Never click on links in unsolicited emails.


Don’t Get Punked by Prime Day Package Delivery Scam


Retail ID

This week, the FTC said it was launching its latest review of the children's privacy law -- abbreviated as COPPA -- asking the public to weigh in on more than two dozen questions pertaining to how the agency enforces the rules.

"The online environment for children continues to evolve at a rapid pace," the FTC said in its notice in the Federal Register, "including, for example, the significant increase in education technology in the classroom and social media and platforms with third-party content appealing to children."


Google expected to pay multimillion dollar penalty to settle investigation into how YouTube handles kids' data

Age ID

The effort is part of the FDA's "The Real Cost" youth e-cigarette prevention campaign, a $60 million initiative that launched last year through social media, digital content and posters at high schools nationwide. The campaign aims to reach almost 10.7 million students ages 12 to 17 who might be at risk of vaping or have already started.

The new ads feature street magician and social media personality Julius Dein performing illusions with people's vapes by appearing to turn them into traditional cigarettes. The FDA said they will run on networks including TeenNick, the CW, MTV and ESPN, in addition to streaming and social media sites.


FDA uses magic tricks in first TV ads to prevent teens from vaping