Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • As Juul grapples with teen vaping ‘epidemic,’ CEO tells parents ‘I’m sorry’ - Former FDA Commissioner blames a teen vaping “epidemic” on Juul
  • Is your home still yours? Alleged SoCal scammers forged signatures to sell property- Check property records online every year
  • Teen’s Two-Pod A Day Juul Addiction Caused Massive Stroke, Lawsuit Says - The stroke required three brain surgeries
  • Federal Judge Instructs FDA To Impose 10-Month Deadline On E-Cigarette Applications - The ruling will have a negative effect on companies like Juul

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Since launching in 2015, Juul has quickly come to dominate the e-cigarette industry with roughly 40% of the market, becoming such a dominant player that Altria, the top U.S. cigarette company, invested $12.8 billion for a 35% stake in the San Francisco-based start-up. But the company has a problem: Its vapes are incredibly popular with teenagers.

The Food and Drug Administration has declared teen vaping an “epidemic,” citing federal survey data that showed nearly 21% of high school students vaped last year. Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb and health care advocates blame the surge in teen vaping on Juul.

As Juul grapples with teen vaping ‘epidemic,’ CEO tells parents ‘I’m sorry’

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A disbarred Los Angeles-area lawyer who has already served time for fraud is facing new charges along with two other suspects in connection with an elaborate alleged real-estate scam.

The three suspects are facing dozens of felony charges.

Angela Fawn Wallace, a disbarred lawyer with multiple arrests for fraud on her record, was allegedly involved in forgery, identity theft, money laundering and grand theft in connection with the scheme, detectives say.


Is your home still yours? Alleged SoCal scammers forged signatures to sell property, police say

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A Connecticut man is suing Juul Labs for causing him to suffer a massive stroke after he became addicted to the company’s products as a teenager. The case marks the first time the e-cigarette company has been sued for a medical issue this severe.

Maxwell Berger, 22, developed an addiction to Juul products during the summer of 2015 as he was finishing his last year of high school, the lawsuit says. By 2017, Berger was taking puffs of his Juul as often as every ten minutes, causing him to go through two cartridges every day. That July, Berger had a massive hemorrhagic stroke, which required three brain surgeries and more than 100 days in the hospital, the lawsuit states. It left him with “catastrophic and permanent injuries” such as left side paralysis, speech impairment and a 50% loss of vision from both eyes.


Teen’s Two-Pod A Day Juul Addiction Caused Massive Stroke, Lawsuit Says

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The shorter timeline was suggested by the FDA last month after a Maryland ruling on a lawsuit filed by anti-tobacco groups. The District Court ruled the FDA exceeded its authority when it decided to allow companies to continue selling e-cigarettes without regulatory approval until 2022.

United States District Judge Paul Grimm wrote in his judgment that he will establish a ten-month deadline for applications to be submitted and a year deadline for applications to be approved. Judge Grimm mentioned the availability of these products to the youth and a clear health emergency as two reasons for his decision.


Federal Judge Instructs FDA To Impose 10-Month Deadline On E-Cigarette Applications