Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Teens can spend $1,000 a year on vaping — and the crackdown on Juul is making it more expensive - Black market appears to be developing
  • Alleged drug dealer was able to get a Real ID license under someone else's name - Onerous requirements not to onerous
  • San Francisco passes ban on e-cigarette sales, a US first - City's board of supervisors unanimously voted in favor
  • EA's Origin had security flaws that could have put up to 300M at risk for identity theft - A "chain of vulnerabilities" in the Origin gaming software

Source: Getty Images/Stockphoto

Age ID

Sophie, a 19-year-old University of Vermont student from Yardley, Pa., makes over $200 a week delivering pizzas and spends a significant chunk of that on a habit that she wishes she had never picked up two years ago.

“I spend $25 a week on pods, which is pretty common for people that Juul often, but there are definitely people that spend more,” Sophie told MarketWatch. Sophie is a pseudonym, and so are the names of the other teens quoted in this story. None of them wanted to be identified as Juul users by future employers who might Google GOOG, +0.46%   them.

Teens can spend $1,000 a year on vaping

Retail ID 

The sometimes onerous requirements needed to get a driver's license compliant with the strict federal Real ID Act didn't stop an alleged drug dealer from obtaining one from the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles under the identity of someone living in Puerto Rico.

Jose Vittini-Arias, charged today in Salem District Court with fentanyl trafficking, drug distribution and identity crimes, had a Real ID-compliant driver's license under the name of Jonathan Almando Roman Vazquez, according to court records.


Alleged drug dealer was able to get a Real ID license under someone else's name

Age ID

San Francisco will become the first US city to effectively ban e-cigarette sales, after the city's board of supervisors unanimously voted in favor of an ordinance Tuesday.

The ordinance says "no person shall sell or distribute an electronic cigarette to a person in San Francisco" unless that product has undergone premarket review by the US Food and Drug Administration. To date, none have.

This includes sales in brick-and-mortar stores, as well as online sales shipped to a San Francisco address. The ordinance also applies to flavored tobacco products in addition to e-cigarettes. The measure does not ban the use of vapes among people 21 and older.

San Francisco passes ban on e-cigarette sales, a US first


Retail ID

Video game publisher Electronic Arts has tightened some openings cybersleuths found in its Origin online network that could have exposed more than 300 million video game players to identity theft and account losses.

EA's Origin platform lets PC gamers buy and play games such as Madden NFL, FIFA, Battlefield and The Sims on the network, as well as chat and play online with others. Origin also connects with Facebook, Xbox Live, PlayStation Network and the Nintendo Network.


EA's Origin had security flaws that could have put up to 300M at risk for identity theft