Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Another lawsuit filed against JUUL is serving as a reminder of how addicting vaping can be - Exploiting adolescents and getting them hooked
  • Northridge man convicted of identity theft, other counts in $3 million conspiracy - To prevent identity theft and fraud
  • Cyber security breach found at American Baptist Homes of the Midwest - Most Americans think they will be victims of cyber crime
  • 200 Undercover Youth Decoys Helping State Catch Tobacco Retailers Selling to Minors - The decoys are recruited volunteers 


Age ID

A Sarasota County family filed a lawsuit against e-cigarette company JUUL Labs Inc., for exploiting adolescents and getting them hooked on the aerosol devices that deliver a more powerful hit of nicotine than cigarettes.

But the family isn't the first to file a lawsuit about the e-cigarette company.

Not long after Marlboro cigarette maker Altria purchased a 35 percent stake in JUUL for $12.8 billion in Dec. 2018, the U.S. Surgeon General issued an advisory, in which 

Another lawsuit filed against JUUL is serving as a reminder of how addicting vaping can be

Retail ID 

A jury found a Northridge man guilty on Friday, May 3, of fraud, money laundering and identity theft in a conspiracy that netted at least $3 million in ill-gotten funds, prosecutors said Monday.

Turhan Lemont Armstrong, 49, was convicted of all 51 offenses listed in a grand jury indictment, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Los Angeles said in a news release. The charges included conspiracy to commit financial institution fraud and the interstate transportation of stolen vehicles.

Northridge man convicted of identity theft, other counts in $3 million conspiracy


Retail ID

American Baptist Homes of the Midwest, owner of Thorne Crest Senior Living Community and Crest Services in Albert Lea, on Monday announced it had an information security breach that could potentially affect some residents.

According to a press release, an unauthorized party gained access to the organization’s computer system and infected the system with malware. The malware reportedly encrypted many of the organization’s records, making them inaccessible out of an effort to extort money — also known as ransomware.

Cyber security breach found at American Baptist Homes of the Midwest


Age ID

In California, a person must be 21 years old to buy any tobacco products, including e-cigarettes and vapes. The decoys work with 24 peace officers, who regularly participate in tobacco enforcement activities, a CDPH spokesperson explains.

About 200 undercover youth decoys are helping state public health officials catch tobacco retailers who sell any type of tobacco products to minors.

The decoys are 15 to 20 years old and their identities are kept confidential, according to the California Department of Public Health.


200 Undercover Youth Decoys Helping State Catch Tobacco Retailers Selling to Minors