Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Texas-based firm says private data of patients exposed - Emcare Inc. says an unauthorized third party gained access
  • Michigan Senate approves ban on e-cigarette sales to minors - The maximum fine was previously $50
  • California woman accused of stealing identities to buy Seahawks tickets, prosecutors say - Stolen credit card numbers and burner cellphones
  • Tobacco in the crosshairs - Never mind that voters rejected a similar idea just three years ago


Retail ID

A company that provides billing and other services to doctors and hospitals across the U.S. says a breach exposed personal data including Social Security numbers and clinical information about some patients.     

Emcare Inc. says an unauthorized third party gained access to the information through employee email accounts.     

Texas-based firm says private data of patients exposed


Age ID 

Legislation to keep electronic cigarettes out of the hands of minors moved forward Tuesday as the Michigan Senate unanimously adopted two bills restricting access to the devices.

Senate Bills 106 and 155 amend the Youth Tobacco Act to criminalize the sale of nicotine vapor products to anyone under the age of 18 and require child-resistant packaging on liquid nicotine containers. Minors would also be prohibited from possessing or using a vapor product or alternative nicotine product.

Michigan Senate approves ban on e-cigarette sales to minors


Retail ID

Renton police detectives are searching for a 29-year-old California woman who they say used stolen identities, stolen credit card numbers and burner cellphones to buy tens of thousands of dollars worth of Seattle Seahawks tickets last season.

Prosecutors said the scheme cost the team $43,000.

King County prosecutors said Sonovah Hillman allegedly stole the name of an Air Force pilot from Oklahoma and used stolen credit card data to buy tickets from the team. 

California woman accused of stealing identities to buy Seahawks tickets, prosecutors say


Age ID

Never mind that voters rejected a similar idea just three years ago, Gov. Jared Polis and some Democratic lawmakers want to try again with a ballot measure to increase cigarette taxes to pay for health care programs.

But unlike Amendment 72, which 53 percent of voters rejected in 2016, this proposal also would add a new tax on electronic cigarettes, also known as vaping.

The proposal calls for increasing the current 84-cent per-pack cigarette tax by $1.75, bringing it to $2.59 a pack. It also would impose a new 62 percent tax on the listed manufacturer's price of e-cigarettes, and raise taxes on other tobacco products, such as cigars and chewing tobacco, from the current 40 percent of the manufacture price, to 62 percent.


Tobacco in the crosshairs