Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Police: 6 people arrested in bust of bank card fraud ring - Ringleader was making his own bank cards that were linked to real accounts
  • These N.J. colleges busted the most (and least) students for alcohol - And the winner (loser) is.....
  • Amid record number of transports, a look at Stanford’s alcohol prevention initiatives -  Twelve years of data reveal trends
  • Police: Dead man's ID was used to buy BMW - Police said it’s a new low in the world of identity theft


Retail ID

Jacksonville police arrested six people accused in a bank fraud ring. The bust serves as a good reminder for people to closely monitor their bank statement statements.

According to arrest reports, Louisseize learned last year how to use something called an encoder to create counterfeit bank cards. The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office said he told police that he obtained bank card numbers through websites, paying for them with bitcoin, and then created the bogus cards.

Police said they recovered the encoder, which is illegal to own, Monday night when they arrested him and five others, who Louisseize said he gave cards, at the Homewood Suites on Kings Avenue in San Marco.

6 people arrested in bust of bank card fraud ring


Age ID 

There is little doubt there is some underage drinking going on at nearly every four-year college in New Jersey.

Whether you get busted for sneaking a beer in your dorm room or tapping a keg at a frat party depends largely on what school you go to, according to an new analysis of campus crime data.

There were 2,628 people either arrested or referred to campus officials for discipline for alcohol violations at New Jersey's four-year colleges and universities in 2017, according to an NJ Advance Media review of campus crime reports on the state's 27 residential campuses.

These N.J. colleges busted the most (and least) students for alcohol

Created by DYLAN GROSZ/The Stanford Daily


Age ID

Allowing residential staff to shoulder the responsibility of alcohol prevention allows Stanford to maintain its legal obligations to the County without instituting a full-on alcohol ban — something both students and the University agree would only lead students to resort to drinking behind closed doors.

“Any policy approach that seeks to curtail high-risk behavior has the potential to move the behavior elsewhere,” wrote five Student Affairs administrators — including former Vice Provost for Student Affairs Greg Boardman and former Dean of ResEd Deborah Golder — in an Oct. 2016 op-ed in The Daily. The op-ed emphasized that “only by changing cultural norms” can high-risk alcohol consumption be reduced.

Part of the attempt to change “cultural norms” means that residential staff are required to keep a close watch on the drinking behavior of students and report incidents to higher officials within ResEd.

Amid record number of transports, a look at Stanford’s alcohol prevention initiatives


Retail ID

Corporal Wilbert Rundles said the car crook used the dead man’s ID to co-sign another loan with an accomplice who used the stolen identity of a living man to buy a second Beamer, an X6.

Investigators said the BMW thief, who had the dead man’s social security number, created a fake license with his picture and the dead man’s ID to garner financing for the two vehicles worth tens of thousands of dollars.

No comment from the dealership on the thefts valued at more than $100,000 at the hands of two men who stooped to a new low.


Police: Dead man's ID was used to buy BMW