Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • How to stop teen vaping? Make e-cigarettes harder to get - License Fees? or Age ID? Age ID will work better.
  • Attorney General joins Social Security Administration movement to prevent identity theft - How do you to address “synthetic identity fraud.”
  • JUUL’S Answer to its PR Crisis? The Millennial Marlboro Man -  Juul confirmed that it plans a national TV ad campaign featuring ex-smokers.
  • Bill proposes lowering blood alcohol limit - The proposal would lower the legal limit from .08 percent blood alcohol content to .05 percent.

Gabby Jones / Bloomberg via Getty Images


Age ID

Licensing fees are typically a suggestion for regulated products. We don't necessarily disagree but enforcement with Age ID trumps licensing fees.

The licensing fees are key, because they mean the regulation pays for itself, so it doesn’t cost the community anything extra to have good anti-tobacco regulations, he said.

“Raising the age for sale has been well-documented to work,” Farber added. “Raising the age for sale to 21, combined with enforcement, decreases youth smoking and is a very, very important initiative.”

How to stop teen vaping? Make e-cigarettes harder to get

Retail ID 

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert H. Slatery III today joined a bipartisan group of 43 states and the District of Columbia urging the Social Security Administration (SSA) to promptly comply with a new provision of federal law that aims to address “synthetic identity fraud.”

“We ask you to evaluate and make necessary modifications to the Social Security Administration database and systems to comply promptly with this new provision of federal law. As enforcers of the data breach laws in our jurisdictions, we see the impact that exposure of Social Security Numbers can have. Our residents lose thousands of dollars a year and suffer from ruined credit scores, as well as a general sense of anxiety regarding their identity,” the attorneys general wrote.

Attorney General joins Social Security Administration movement to pre-vent identity theft

TONY CENICOLA/THE NEW YORK TIMES/REDUX


Age ID

On Tuesday Juul confirmed that it plans a national TV ad campaign featuring ex-smokers who used Juul to help them quit traditional cigarettes. CNBC, which first reported the plan, said Juul plans an initial $10 million campaign, airing on national cable channels after 10pm local time and aimed at adults 35 and older.

TV ads for tobacco products have been banned under federal and state regulations since the 1970s, and print ads are restricted. Advertising standards have not been formalized for e-cigarettes, which are regulated differently by the Food and Drug Administration. E-cigarette companies have advertised on TV before, notably Blu and NJOY, which ran a Super Bowl ad in 2012. But in the intervening years, Juul has far eclipsed both brands, with 70 percent of the retail market, according to data from Nielsen.

Juul’s Answer to Its PR Crisis? The Millennial Marlboro Man

Age ID

A bill afoot in the Oregon Legislature could spell trouble for those who drink a couple of beers before getting behind the wheel.

The proposal would lower the legal limit from .08 percent blood alcohol content to .05 percent.

Rep. Pam Marsh, D-Ashland, said she hasn’t yet weighed the merits of the bill, but she isn’t sure lowering the legal limit would make a significant difference, since police officers already can arrest a person who’s driving impaired even if his blood alcohol level is below the limit.

According to the American Beverage Institute, a 180-pound man would need to consume about four drinks to reach the current limit, while the same man would reach 0.05 after just over two drinks during the same period. Women generally have a higher blood alcohol level with fewer drinks. A drink is defined as 1.25 ounces of 80-proof liquor, a 12-ounce beer or a 5-ounce glass of wine.


Bill proposes lowering blood alcohol limit