Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • As vaping surges, teen cigarette smoking ticks up after decades of decline - Up to 8.1% from 7.6% last year
  • Man Steals $13,000 in Jewelry From Vending Machine  - Is it crazy to put jewelry in a vending machine?
  • Schools, health department launch new programs to curb teen vaping in Arizona - Schools need to be more proactive to combat this epidemic.
  • Apple CEO Calls For Laws Curbing 'Data Industrial Complex' - Do we need comprehensive federal privacy law reform?


Age ID

  • This year, 8.1 percent of high school students reported smoking cigarettes, up from 7.6 percent last year, according to preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's annual National Youth Tobacco Survey.
  • Teen smoking rates have plummeted since peaking in 1997 when 36.4 percent of high school kids smoked cigarettes.
  • One e-cigarette brand in particular, Juul, has become a target of parents, teachers and now regulators.

As vaping surges, teen cigarette smoking ticks up after decades of decline


Retail ID

When designer Marla Aaron set up a vending machine featuring her jewelry in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, N.Y., offering items ranging from $100 to $1,500, videos on her site proclaimed “it’s crazy to put jewelry in a vending machine.”

Unfortunately, that has proven all too true. On Sept. 20 at 1:15 p.m., a man (pictured) used fraudulent credit cards to purchase approximately $13,000 worth of jewelry from the machine. The New York City Police Department is now seeking his arrest for grand larceny.

Man Steals $13,000 in Jewelry From Vending Machine


Age ID

Officials with the Cave Creek Unified School District confirmed that more students are vaping or using e-cigarettes, and it's getting harder to catch because of sleek brands like Juul, which are disguised as flash drives.

The principal of Cactus Shadows High School says students caught have to take a three-day course on vaping and its risks. Parents say they were made aware of this alarming trend from their children's schools.

Schools, health department launch new programs to curb teen vaping in Arizona


Retail ID

Federal lawmakers should pass privacy legislation that would give consumers a new set of rights, including the right to “have personal data minimized,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said today at a privacy conference in Brussels.

"We at Apple are in full support of a comprehensive federal privacy law in the United States," Cook said. He went on to propose four “essential rights” for consumers, including the rights to data minimization and the right to access data collected about them.

In a 22-minute speech, Cook criticized the “data industrial complex,” stating that personal information "is being weaponized against us with military efficiency."

Apple CEO Calls For Laws Curbing 'Data Industrial Complex'