Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • DPS reports 800% rise in fake ID citations since the opening of the USC Village - It seems like everyone has a fake ID these days.
  • Serial squatter gets 6 years in prison for identity theft - Make sure you check who leases your property.
  • Exploring the Cost of Alcohol - A multi-part series from the Centre Daily Times, explores the financial and human burdens that come with it.
  • Number of teens who vape has jumped 75% this year, new study finds - About 20% of high school students used e-cigarettes in past 30 days.


Age ID

USC opens USC Village and sees a HUGE increase in fake ID citations. College communities need to be extra diligent in combating underage drinking. Fake IDs from China are foolproof to the naked eye. Intellicheck's Age ID makes sure you are covered. 

DPS reports 800% rise in fake ID citations since the opening of the USC Village


Identity ID

The Denver Post reports 43-year-old Heather Schwab was sentenced in Adams County on Monday after previously pleading guilty to felony identity theft. Prosecutors say that on Feb. 15, she signed an 18-month lease and wrote two checks for $4,400 — rent and deposit — for a Thornton home. Both checks bounced.


Serial squatter gets 6 years in prison for identity theft


Age ID

State College exists because of Penn State. But along with the many positives of living in a university town, there are negatives, too. A major one is the cost of alcohol use. “The Cost of Alcohol,” a multipart series from the Centre Daily Times, explores the financial and human burdens that come with it.

The expenses associated with alcohol, and out-of-town visitors, are compounded by the fact that university towns often have a lot of university-owned property that is tax exempt.

Exploring the Cost of Alcohol


Age ID

The Wall Street Journal reports that teen use of e-cigarettes has soared this year, according to new research conducted in 2018 that suggest fast-changing youth habits will pose a challenge for public-health officials, schools and parents.

Number of teens who vape has jumped 75% this year, new study finds