Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 64

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • 8th vaping-related death reported as illnesses top 500 nationwide - Canada also reported its first case
  • 169 million people have had their health records compromised in data breaches - A study of 1461 health care breaches between 2009 and 2019
  • Mass. Gov. Baker Plans 4-Month Ban On Vaping Product Sales - Pauses sales in order for medical experts to collect more information 
  • Two Gulf Breeze doctors accused of acquiring drugs by fraud and identity theft - Fraudulently obtained controlled substances


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More than 500 people have been diagnosed with vaping-related breathing illnesses, but the cause remains unknown, U.S. health officials said Thursday. An eighth death was also reported.

Meanwhile, the Food and Drug Administration revealed that its criminal investigations unit started tracking leads early on, as cases pointed to black-market vaping products. The agency's tobacco director, Mitch Zeller, stressed that it is not interested in prosecuting individuals who use illegal products but is lending a hand because of the unit's "special skills."

8th vaping-related death reported as illnesses top 500 nationwide


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Cyber criminals compromised the health records of more than 169 million people across the country over the past decade, according to study published Monday in the medical journal Annals of Internal Medicine.

The study, which analyzed 1461 health care breaches reported to the federal government between Oct. 21, 2009 and July 1, 2019, concluded that all incidents over that time period revealed at least one crucial piece of personal information, including patient names, e-mail addresses and phone numbers. In 964 cases, hackers managed to access social security numbers, driver's license numbers and dates of birth of approximately 150 million people.

169 million people have had their health records compromised in data breaches

Joshua Bright for The New York Times

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Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker said on Tuesday he would request the Public Health Council to order a four-month ban on the sale of all vaping products in the state. 

Baker made the announcement at a press conference where he said he was declaring a public health emergency in connection with vaping-related lung illnesses.

Hundreds of cases of the illness have been reported nationwide. Massachusetts Public Health Commissioner Monica Bharel this month ordered all cases to be reported directly to the Department of Public Health for the next year.


Mass. Gov. Baker Plans 4-Month Ban On Vaping Product Sales

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Two Gulf Breeze doctors are facing federal charges for allegedly acquiring controlled substances through fraud and identity theft, according to federal prosecutors.

Robert Patrick Jensen, 49, and Michael T. Harris, 44, appeared in federal court this week for initial appearances after they were indicted by a grand jury on charges of acquiring controlled substances by fraud and identity theft, according to U.S. Attorney Lawrence Keefe.

If convicted, Jensen and Harris each face a maximum of four years in prison for acquiring controlled substances by fraud and a maximum of 20 years in prison for identity theft.


Two Gulf Breeze doctors accused of acquiring drugs by fraud and identity theft

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 63

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • CDC narrows investigation of mysterious vaping-related lung disease to 380 cases - At least six people have died from the illness
  • Senate chairman worried ‘Real ID’ will shock air travelers - Airport security set to require enhanced driver’s licenses in one year
  • Congresswoman Calls for Ban on Vaping Products - There have been hundreds of reports of lung-related health issues 
  • Here’s how to claim your $100 from Yahoo’s massive data breach settlement - Yahoo is close to reaching a $117.5 million settlement

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U.S. health officials have narrowed their investigation of a mysterious lung disease that has killed at least six people to 380 “probable” and “confirmed” cases, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

Doctors suspect vaping as a possible cause of the illnesses, which are spread out over 36 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The CDC said it’s homed in on the 380 likely or confirmed cases, instead of the more than 450 “possible” illnesses it was reviewing last week. It will no longer release data on cases that are less certain, the agency said.

CDC narrows investigation of mysterious vaping-related lung disease to 380 cases

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A post-9/11 law designed to keep people from using fake IDs to board airplanes is one year away from taking effect, but the chairman of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee worries that it’s destined to create “Y2K-type disruption” at the nation’s airports in October 2020.

Even though most states are issuing Real IDs — enhanced driver’s licenses required with the passage of a 2005 law  — Mississippi Republican Roger Wicker said he worries passengers who don’t have them and don’t know they need them will be caught by surprise on Oct. 1, 2020, when airports begin requiring the enhanced identification to pass through security.


Senate chairman worried ‘Real ID’ will shock air travelers

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Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro made an impassioned plea to the FDA Friday to remove all e-cigarettes and vaping products from the market.

Thursday the Connecticut Department of Public Health said there are six new cases of lung-related health issues believed to be connected to vaping, bringing the total in the state to 11. There have been hundreds of cases reported nationwide including six deaths, and no one seems to know what the cause is.


Congresswoman Calls for Ban on Vaping Products


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The class-action lawsuit comes after several major data breaches or “data security intrusions” — essentially when a hacker got into the system but didn’t take any information — that plagued Yahoo over the course of several years. Yahoo sent out an email about the settlement on Wednesday, detailing all the of the breaches that happened over the years.

In 2012, two different hackers accessed Yahoo’s internal systems, but didn’t take anything. In 2013, ”malicious actors” got into the company’s database and took records from all of Yahoo’s accounts — roughly 3 billion in all. The hackers behind that breach could have gotten into users’ email accounts, calendars, and contacts.


Here’s how to claim your $100 from Yahoo’s massive data breach settlement

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 62

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • From binge drinking to blacking out, the epidemic putting America's kids in danger - "Drinking Culture: American Kids and the Danger of Being Cool"
  • Scottsdale police bust 5-member ID theft crew find "hundreds of altered credit cards" - Fake credit cards to rent two Cadillacs and a Mustang
  • CDC warns about e-cigarette use after rise in vaping-related deaths - Five deaths from vaping-related illnesses have been confirmed
  • Boy Scouts’ information exposed during brief data breach - A partner inadvertently exposed the personal information of children and their parents

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On America's college campuses, there are epidemics we talk about and those we don't. There's sexual assault. There are fraternity hazing deaths. And in both cases, the attention of the nation usually turns to these issues only after a tragedy has occurred… after Penn State freshman Timothy Piazza dies from consuming 18 drinks in 82 minutes… after Brock Turner sexually assaults an unconscious woman behind a dumpster at Stanford...

Look deeper, however, and these epidemics have something in common: the pervasive and problematic drinking culture among American youth.

From binge drinking to blacking out, the disturbing epidemic putting America's kids in danger

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A security researcher has discovered databases containing more than 419 million records tied to Facebook accounts. It appears the data -- which includes phone numbers and Facebook IDs and in some cases users' names, genders and countries -- was scraped from the platform. However, it's not clear who pulled that information from Facebook or why.

The dataset included 133 million records on Facebook users in the US, 18 million on people in the UK and 50 million on users in Vietnam. The researcher, Sanyam Jain, found the databases on an exposed server that wasn't protected with a password. He told TechCrunch he found phone numbers linked to several celebrities.


Scottsdale police bust 5-member ID theft crew find "hundreds of altered credit cards"

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A severe and puzzling lung disease linked to electronic cigarettes and other vaping devices has doctors across the country scrambling to diagnose and care for patients struggling to breathe. On Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the number of vaping-related illnesses jumped to at least 450 cases in 33 states and cautioned people about using e-cigarettes, especially those bought off the street.

As of Friday, five deaths from vaping-related respiratory illness were reported.


CDC warns about e-cigarette use after rise in vaping-related deaths


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Last week, Trails End said it notified Boy Scouts of America and local councils of “a data incident” that a web developer noticed. Certain information — including children’s full names, dates of birth, email addresses, phone number, parent names, favorite product and affiliation (council, district, unit) — was visible through a search.

It’s unclear how many users’ information was vulnerable during the “incident,” and whether it was a local issue or a national one. Mecklenburg County Council includes roughly 11,900 youth participants alone, according to the group’s website.


Boy Scouts’ information exposed during brief data breach

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 61

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Teen in coma after developing severe lung disease from vaping - Doctors said he may need a double lung transplant
  • Facebook’s latest leak includes data on millions of users - It contained phone numbers and users' names, genders and countries.
  • Sonoma County health officials issue alert amid vaping-related lung injuries - Could be associated with vaping cannabis
  • Providence Health Plan notifying 122K members of 3rd-party data breach - The timing of the breach may have started nine years ago

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The Bloomsburg University student had quit using the e-cigarettes but started again because of their flavor and got hooked, Boclair said to Fox 29.

Health officials have warned against using e-cigarettes and other vaping products, which they’ve linked to a rise of breathing illnesses.

In July, eight teens with a history of vaping were hospitalized with “seriously damaged lung” at The Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin.

Teen in coma after developing severe lung disease from vaping

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A security researcher has discovered databases containing more than 419 million records tied to Facebook accounts. It appears the data -- which includes phone numbers and Facebook IDs and in some cases users' names, genders and countries -- was scraped from the platform. However, it's not clear who pulled that information from Facebook or why.

The dataset included 133 million records on Facebook users in the US, 18 million on people in the UK and 50 million on users in Vietnam. The researcher, Sanyam Jain, found the databases on an exposed server that wasn't protected with a password. He told TechCrunch he found phone numbers linked to several celebrities.


Facebook’s latest leak includes data on millions of users

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Sonoma County health officials have issued a health alert warning against lung injuries related to vaping.

Dr. Celeste Philip, the county’s health officer, issued the alert last week, urging clinicians to watch for lung illnesses that could be associated with vaping cannabis, as well as cannabis oils or nicotine products.

The local health alert comes on the heels of a similar statewide warning by the California Department of Public Health. Since June, 36 cases of vaping-associated lung illness have required hospitalization throughout the state, according to the department.


Sonoma County health officials issue alert amid vaping-related lung injuries

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The Oregonian reported that the security breach could impact as many as 122,000 Providence Health Plan members. Providence Health Plan did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The data stored or potentially accessible from Dominion National’s computer servers may have included enrollment and demographic information for current and former members of Providence Health Plan’s dental program. The information may include names, addresses, email addresses, dates of birth, Social Security numbers, member identification numbers, group numbers and subscriber numbers, Providence Health Plan said.


Providence Health Plan notifying 122K members of 3rd-party data breach

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 60

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Milwaukee urges people to stop vaping immediately amid lung disease outbreak - There are 16 confirmed cases in cases in Wisconsin
  • 5 People In Maryland Have Severe Lung Illnesses After Using E-Cigarettes, Health Department Says - Respiratory symptoms reported by patients
  • FTC is reportedly investigating Juul’s marketing practices - The FTC began its investigation before Altria took a stake in Juul
  • The best identity theft protection and monitoring services for 2019 - CNET compared the top identity monitoring services


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"We continue to learn more about the health effects associated with e-cigarettes," Milwaukee Health Commissioner Jeanette Kowalik said in a statement. "As the public health authority for the city, the MHD is committed to protecting the public from the dangers of secondhand exposure."

The city urged people to immediately contact their doctor if they experience any of the following symptoms: anorexia, cough, diarrhea, fatigue, fever, nausea, chest pain, or shortness of breath.

Milwaukee urges people to stop vaping immediately amid lung disease outbreak

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These cases are part of the nearly 200 reported incidents of vaping-related illness in 22 states- resulting in at least one death.

“The Maryland Department of Health is taking this issue seriously and is working with local health departments, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration to identify anyone who may be experiencing similar symptoms,” said MDH Deputy Secretary for Public Health Frances B. Phillips.

The official cause of these illnesses is not yet known and hasn’t been linked to any particular device, substance or brand.


5 People In Maryland Have Severe Lung Illnesses After Using E-Cigarettes, Health Department Says

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The Federal Trade Commission is investigating whether e-cigarette maker Juul used deceptive marketing and targeted minors, The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday, citing people familiar with the investigation.

The FTC is considering seeking monetary damages, the Journal reported, citing one of the people. The FTC, which polices marketing activities, began its investigation in September 2018, the Journal reported. Tobacco giant Altria later took a 35% stake in Juul, which was launched in 2015 and is privately held, for $12.8 billion. Shares of Altria slid by more than 3% on Thursday.


FTC is reportedly investigating Juul’s marketing practices

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Unfortunately, you may need one of these protection services soon, if you don't already. That's because identity theft is a massive and growing problem, with more enormous data breaches hitting victims with increasing regularity. In 2016 alone, there were more than 15 million US identity fraud cases, with identity theft victims losing more than $16 billion not to mention untold damage to credit reports. The 2017 Equifax breach was the icing on a very bad cake -- one that got even worse in the months that followed. More recently, the Starwood Marriott breach compromised the personal information of more than 380 million guests, including more than 5 million passport numbers.


The best identity theft protection and monitoring services for 2019