Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 49

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Here’s how to avoid medical identity theft - Steps everyone can take to make sure tasks such as picking up prescriptions.
  • No VA loans for cannabis workers? - You’ll have to decide between one form of green or the other.
  • Free DNA test opens doors to identity theft - What will they think of next?
  • Stonington and Groton coalitions partner to prevent underage drinking through beverage server education - Need Age ID to complete it! 


Retail ID

“Medical identity theft can be even more damaging than standard identity theft,” said Sterling Price, health-care analyst at ValuePenguin, a financial website. “Criminals use your information to purchase costly medical services, which can lead to tens of thousands of dollars in damages and often take years to fix completely.”

Quest, one of the nation’s largest clinical laboratories, announced earlier this month that an unauthorized user gained access to the personal information — including Social Security numbers and financial data — of nearly 12 million patients.

Here’s how to avoid medical identity theft

Age ID 

Veterans in the cannabis industry are being denied because VA considers the cannabis industry incapable of being "stable and reliable,” according to a story in Roll Call, which first reported about the VA policy

The letter acknowledges that “the ambiguity under which the cannabis industry operates is unique,” and that lawmakers "fully understand the VA’s resulting aversion to legal and financial risk.”

But it goes on to say: “Denying veterans the benefits they’ve earned, however, is contrary to the intent Congress separately demonstrated in its creation of VA benefit programs.”

No VA loans for cannabis workers?

Retail ID

The latest is an offer for a free DNA test that supposedly can show whether you might get cancer or another disease, according to the Identity Theft Resource Center.

This scam is showing up at health fairs and assisted living facilities, with the perpetrators claiming that the test is covered by Medicare. All you have to do is provide your Social Security number and Medicare card.

“With this information, scammers might obtain medical care using your name, sell the information on the dark web or commit other forms of identity theft,” the resource center says.

Free DNA test opens doors to identity theft

Age ID

Coalition staff and volunteers will be conducting outreach to local businesses as part of the project to provide them with education about the harms of underage drinking and give them materials to help them keep the community safe. Each participating business will receive a packet containing information about underage drinking prevention, tips on how to properly check IDs and reminders on the legal issues they could face if they serve underage. An optional pledge card will be available for the owner and employees to sign. Businesses are encouraged to tighten policies for their staff to ensure that they never serve to a minor and always pass state compliance checks.


Stonington and Groton coalitions partner to prevent underage drinking through beverage server education

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 48

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • 'I have never felt so powerless': Fairfax County schools and parents battle vaping crisis - 37% of 12th graders saying they had vaped in the last year
  • Fraud ring stole $19M worth of iPhones, other hardware from stores across the US - Group of thieves posed as customers buying new phones
  • N.C. House bill on game day beer, wine sales advances in N.C. Senate - The House approved the bill by an 87-25 vote April 16
  • Juul to San Francisco: ‘We’re staying’ - Said he’s committed to keeping the business and its fast-growing workforce in San Francisco

Age ID

Three weeks after a group of students were disciplined for using e-cigarettes on the grounds of Franklin Middle School in March 2018, a parent sent an email to Braddock District School Board representative Megan McLaughlin.

“I have never felt so frustrated by Fairfax County Public Schools as I do now,” she wrote, referring to the ‘constant threat’ of vaping culture among underage kids. “I have never felt so powerless. I get it: Parents need to educate themselves. [Robinson High School principal Matt Eline]’s email in early February was efficient. However, I’ve heard nothing else about it from FCPS. Is it possible that I am the only parent asking about this stuff?”

'I have never felt so powerless': Fairfax County schools and parents battle vaping crisis


Retail ID 

Six people are being charged in New York with conspiracy, mail fraud and identity theft over allegedly stealing $19 million worth of devices, chiefly Apple iPhones. These people were reportedly at the head of a large, organized effort to purchase phones on contracts that were fraudulently signed using stolen identities. The gambit ran for some seven years. 

Despite acquiring the iPhones in all these different states, the group would usually send them back to New York for resale. This technique was, in part, how they were caught. An unnamed person at the overnight shipping firm the group used became suspicious of the number of parcels and informed the authorities.

The case against the fraudsters was filed by federal prosecutors with the Southern District of New York in April. 

Fraud ring stole $19M worth of iPhones, other hardware from stores across the US


Age ID

A bipartisan state House bill cleared Wednesday its first Senate committee hurdle to allow state universities to ramp up beer and wine sales on game days.

Right now, sales and consumption of alcohol for those age 21 and older are not legally permitted other than in certain areas at Kenan Stadium at UNC Chapel Hill and Carter-Finley Stadium at N.C. State.

House Bill 389 would expand sales and consumption at campus stadiums, arenas and athletic facilities — if their boards of trustees approve. Mixed drinks would be available at non-sports events if vendors have the right permit.

N.C. House bill on game day beer, wine sales advances in N.C. Senate


Age ID

As San Francisco officials prepare to consider a bill that would suspend the sale of e-cigarettes in the city, the CEO of Juul Labs — the controversial, homegrown company that sells the majority of e-cigarettes in the U.S. — said he’s committed to keeping the business and its fast-growing workforce in San Francisco.

“Yes, we’re staying,” Juul CEO Kevin Burns said Thursday in a wide-ranging interview with The Chronicle’s editorial board. “San Francisco is our home. We want to be in San Francisco. We have 1,200 employees in San Francisco, a huge talent base in San Francisco. We want to be a resident, and I’m hopeful we’ll find a way to be a resident.”


Juul to San Francisco: ‘We’re staying’

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 47

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Rockland, Westchester stores cited in underage alcohol sting - Others refused to sell to underage decoys
  • Vaping becomes the new tobacco for teen users? - E-CIGARETTES, OR VAPES, are now the most commonly used tobacco product among youth
  • Jury convicts Chesapeake man of auto loan fraud scheme - Charges of credit union fraud and aggravated identity theft
  • Mom And Dad, I'm Going To Cannabis School - Colleges are launching cannabis-centric courses to train the next generation of industry leaders.

Age ID

Thirty-one stores and bars in Rockland and Westchester sold alcohol to minors in a sting using underage decoys, the New York State Liquor Authority said.

Twenty-seven other establishments in the counties refused to sell to the decoys.

The operation was part of an effort looking for fake IDs and retailers that sell to minors, including restaurants, grocery stores and liquor stores.

“We will continue to take action to hold businesses accountable for illegal sales as well as those who use fake IDs,” Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a statement announcing the results this month. “We have zero tolerance for these offenses in New York.”

Rockland, Westchester stores cited in underage alcohol sting


Age ID 

Just as cigarettes had their heyday, so have e-cigarettes, or vapes; however the difference is that right now, vaping is growing in popularity, and it’s not simply being used to quit smoking.

In the United States, youth are more likely than adults to use e-cigarettes, according to STATESystem through the CDC. In 2018 alone, more than 3.6 million U.S. youth, including one in five (20.8%) high school students and one in 20 (4.9%) middle school students used e-cigarettes.

In 2017, 6.9 million U.S. adults, or one in 36 (2.8%) of adults, used e-cigarettes/vapes.

Vaping becomes the new tobacco for teen users?


Retail ID

A federal jury convicted a Chesapeake man on May 16 for charges of credit union fraudand aggravated identity theft.

Court records and evidence presented at trial stated that 25-year-old Adante Leshaun Dupree took part in a scheme to defraud Navy Federal Credit Union.

Dupree and his co-conspirators bought the stolen identities of out-of-state victims using the darkweb, opened Navy Federal Credit Union accounts in their name, and applied for auto loans from the credit union in the names of the identity theft victims.

 

Jury convicts Chesapeake man of auto loan fraud scheme

Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS


Age ID

A few years ago, when Michigan was considering legalizing cannabis, officials at Northern Michigan University asked faculty to come up with “futuristic leading-edge academic majors.” The result: Students from around the country can now enroll in a cannabis-centric medicinal chemistry program, which has grown to 230 students in just two years. The program provides a background in botany and analytical chemistry, then students choose an entrepreneurial or bioanalytical track. Graduates are expected, in part, to staff testing labs as part of the state’s newly legal cannabis market.


Mom And Dad, I'm Going To Cannabis School

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 46

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Colorado Boy, 17, Shot Dead During Robbery By Cheerleader, 3 Other Teens Who Wanted Vaping Products - Over $25 worth of vaping products
  • As NC attorney general tries to slow Juul use among NC teens, researchers weigh health effects of e-cigarettes - Weight loss a symptom
  • McConnell unveils bill to combat youth tobacco use by raising purchase age to 21 - "Youth vaping is a public health crisis"
  • Most of Juul’s Twitter followers are teens who can’t buy e-cigs - And they say they don't market to kids


Age ID

A cheerleader and three teenagers are suspected of killing a high school student over $25 worth of vaping products. Lloyd Chavez was shot dead outside his home in Centennial, a city 16 miles south-east of Denver, Colorado, at 9:30 p.m. local time (11:30 p.m. ET) on May 8.

The victim and Mitchell began arguing in the front yard and at some point during the altercation, a shot was fired and hit Chavez in the chest. Serrano insisted it was Mitchell who fired the shot, explaining Gallegos had not got physically involved in the altercation.

COLORADO BOY, 17, SHOT DEAD DURING ROBBERY BY CHEERLEADER, 3 OTHER TEENS WHO WANTED VAPING PRODUCTS, POLICE SAY


Age ID 

Luka Kinard was a 15-year-old high school freshman when he started vaping, first inhaling the flavored nicotine at a high school football game as a way to fit in.

As Luka became, by his description, the go-to-guy for other students to vape with, his mother Kelly Kinard became more and more troubled by a pendulum swing in his behavior.

His grades plunged. His weight dropped.

As NC attorney general tries to slow Juul use among NC teens, researchers weigh health effects of e-cigarettes



Age ID

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell formally introduced legislation Monday to raise the age for buying tobacco and e-cigarettes to 21, a move designed to combat the health effects of tobacco addiction across the country and help his home state of Kentucky move off production of the crop that has sagged in popularity for decades.

"Youth vaping is a public health crisis," McConnell said. "It's our responsibility as parents and public servants to do everything we can to keep these harmful products out of high schools and out of youth culture."

"Kentucky farmers don't want their children to get hooked on tobacco products while they are in middle school or high school any more than any parent anywhere wants that to happen," McConnell said. "Kentucky is proud of what we make but we also want pride in the health and development of our children and the sad reality is that Kentucky's been home to the highest rates of cancer in our country."

McConnell unveils bill to combat youth tobacco use by raising purchase age to 21


Age ID

Almost half of the people who followed Juul on Twitter last year were not old enough to legally purchase e-cigarettes in the United States, according to a study published on Monday.

Researchers analyzed data collected in April 2018 on public followers of Juul’s Twitter account (@JUULvapor) with at least one public tweet. About 45% of those who followed Juul were 13 to 17 years old, according to the study published online in JAMA Pediatrics.


Most of Juul’s Twitter followers are teens who can’t buy e-cigs

Intellicheck’s Weekly Roundup Vol 45

Enjoy our roundup of stories that piqued our interest this week.

This week we tackle the following:

  • Behind The Scenes As State Inspectors Police Boston Nightclubs - Enforcing laws designed to protect patrons of the state’s clubs and bars
  • 20% of NC stores caught selling tobacco to minors, putting federal funds at risk - Law enforcement is cracking down on selling tobacco to minors
  • Vaping crackdown: Ohio, other states continue push to stop teen use - Trying to stem an epidemic of underage e-cigarette use
  • Touchstone Medical Imaging to pay $3 million settlement for security breach - Exposed the health information of more than 300,000 patients


Age ID

Outside Venu, the line to get in is so long that dozens of people spill out onto the streets. This is one of Boston’s hottest nightclubs. It’s also where 23-Year-old Jassy Correia was last seen before she was allegedly abducted and murdered back in February.

On a recent Friday night, the I-Team went along with the Massachusetts Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission to get an exclusive, behind-the-scenes look at how they are enforcing laws designed to protect patrons of the state’s clubs and bars.

Behind The Scenes As State Inspectors Police Boston Nightclubs


Age ID 

Law enforcement is cracking down on businesses selling tobacco to minors.

Officers say it's not only putting the minors' health at risk, but also millions of dollars of state funding.

Israel Morrow, special agent in charge with North Carolina Alcohol Law Enforcement, says the number of children using tobacco products is alarming. 

"They've become dependent on it like some people become dependent on drugs," Morrow said.

20% of NC stores caught selling tobacco to minors, putting federal funds at risk


Age ID

When Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine announced his plan last month to raise the state tobacco age to 21, he joined what has become a critical mass of states and localities trying to stem an epidemic of underage e-cigarette use.

The numbers are shocking – between 2017 and 2018 alone, e-cigarette use increased 78 percent among high school students and 48 percent among middle school students, according to the Food and Drug Administration.

Vaping crackdown: Ohio, other states continue push to stop teen use


Retail ID

A medical imaging service provider in Tennessee has agreed to pay $3 million to the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as a settlement for a security breach that exposed the protected health information of more than 300,000 patients.

The result of an FTP server providing uncontrolled access to patients’ personal health information, the breach at Touchstone Medical Imaging led to the leaking of names, birth dates, social security numbers, and addresses among other information. The details were accessed and indexed by search engines, and remained on the internet even after the server was taken offline. 

 


Touchstone Medical Imaging to pay $3 million settlement for security breach